Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 25, 2003, 8:56 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 3
Default weight of camera importance

I was wondering if the subcompact cameras are to light to hold steady to get a blur free photo. I was considering the canon s400 over the canon s50 because of size, weight and portability but i have concerns about the topic I spoke of. Any comments on this subject would be greatly appreciated.
paulwayneg is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 25, 2003, 9:21 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,910
Default

No matter what the weight of the camera, if you're not steady, if you shoot below 1/30th of a second without a tripod, if you use a long zoom in low light, your picture will be blurry!
Mike_PEAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 25, 2003, 9:54 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 430
Default

For me, stability is more a function of how securely I can hold the camera rather than its weight. That is to say, a camera that offers a comfortable, secure grip, is well balanced, and has the shutter (and other controls) that fall naturally in my hand will give me the most shake free shots.

I'm sure that it is a highly individualized thing, but for me, the Oly C-x0xx series just seems to feel right (as compared to the equivalent Nikons, for example).
jawz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 25, 2003, 10:21 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,910
Default

I have to agree with that. But what I HATE about digital camera makers is the forget about the left side of the camera body. In my case I'm left handed and I have a weakend right hand due to an injury with a drill...I can't hold on to most of the digital cameras properly because there's no left side to them (yes there's the lens, but most have retracting lens assemblies which you can't hold on to). I had no problems with my SLR as it had a portion to the left of the lens as well.

Can I also rant about the left-eyed here? If you can't use your left eye properly like you can your right eye, the camera can't be steadied against your face...again I had no problem with my SLR, and even could put an eyecup on it.

Why can't the digital camera division learn from their optical counterparts about what it takes to make a good camera!
Mike_PEAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 25, 2003, 11:43 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
KCan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,625
Default

I prefer heavier camera. The mass of the camera (and anything attached to it, ie lens, flash bracket …) contribute to reduce shake/vibration at the “high frequency end”.
KCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 26, 2003, 8:30 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,162
Default

I agree that holding position and having a good layout for the controls is important. The compromise for cam designers is often making them smaller means features have to be accessed through scrolling menu's. Bigger cams , whilst not handbag sized, do allow more area for buttons which I prefer to menus. Partcularly when EVF's and lcd can be dificult to see. If you can pick up a cam and use its features in the dark without reaching for the handbook, then that's the first test for me. I've sometimes shot down to 1/15th on my S602, and have been surprised how sharp the results have been when I expected blur.

As for disability design, I agree more account should be taken where it enhances or doesn't compromise ease of use for the majority buyer. Dioptre adjustment I now see as essential on any future cam I might buy.
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 26, 2003, 9:34 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 394
Default Well OK

Adding just enough weight, perhaps using the tripod mount, to lower the center of gravity of the camera can help, especially if you can align it, or make it below, the centerline of the axis of the lens. The hard part is to do this without altering the portability of the camera. Target rifles are made heavy to "hold" on the bullseye, but how much a camera should weigh is....well who knows? I have a heavy camera and like it.
normc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 26, 2003, 10:24 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 365
Default

I went to a Nikon seminar not too long ago and they talked about various way to keep a camera steady. One of them was to add additional weight to the camera. They gave an example of some police officers using digital cameras and a zoom to do stake outs. None of the officers could get good pictures (and a tripod was out of the question) so they rigged these divers weights to attach to the tripod mount. Immediately the officers were able to get better pictures. Reason being was the extra weight gave the camera additional intertia to keep the camera steady.

Other ways to hold the camera steady are:

1. the classic breathing techniques
2. thread a bolt through the a chain ( such as a dog chain) and attach the bolt to the tripod mount. Then while holding the camera, step on the chain with your foot and pull against the chain.
3. Monopod
mdparker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 26, 2003, 11:04 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 3
Default

Thank you to all for your comments on this matter. I greatly appreciate it. I think I will go with a mid sized camera such as the Canon s50 to play it safe instead of the subcompact s400. Thanks again.
paulwayneg is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:54 AM.