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Old May 31, 2006, 5:41 PM   #1
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Hi there.

I have been trying to get monitor colors on my new canon i9950 without much luck. I use coorvision colorplus to calibrate my monitor and i am wondering if the ambient light is intervening with the calibration process. My monitor is suited under a 2x36Watt fluorecent lamp. I usually edit my photos under these lighting conditions. Is it bettter to calibrate the monitor in total darkness?
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Old May 31, 2006, 9:40 PM   #2
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No, you should calibrate in the environment that you will use the monitor.
Are you using an LCD or CRT? I know that with a CRT you should let it warm up a bit before calibrating. The monitor's image changes over the first 1/2 hour or so.

Do you have a profile for the paper you're using, made specifically for that printer? This is also a must.

I have no experience with the Coorvision colorplus system. does it involve a hardware device to profile with? I only recommend systems that use hardware components.

What software are you printing from? Are you soft-proofing your images? That is a must for high quality results.

Eric
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 11:11 AM   #3
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thanks for your reply. I have a sony 17'' LCD. i print usingPS CS2. I use original canon profiles with the canon paper. I am sure that my color managment setting in PS are correct. but still the colors dont match the screen. the colors are less saturated. especially reds which are very washed out. Soft proofing doesnt make a difference. I was thinking if the lights in the room are interfering with montor calibration. Colorplus is a hardware monitor device.
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 1:11 PM   #4
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Eric is correct in saying to calibrate in the same lighting you view your monitor in. But after there should be no light shining directly on the screen. So if the fluorecent light is right above your monitor and shining down on it, I would suggest turning it off during calibration and also leave it off during the viewing and editing of your photos.
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 1:44 PM   #5
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Have you checked to see if AdobeGama is still running?

Photoshop comes with a memory resident program that is supposed to help profile your monitor in software-only. Since you have a hardware device to do this, you want to make sure that AdobeGama isn't running and make sure it never runs again!

If you can work with the lights off, definitely do so. At least try not to prevent them from causing any glare.

Once you believe you've got a good profile, then you must do softproofing in CS2 to see what the effects of the paper & ink will be on your print.

Eric
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 2:13 PM   #6
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I have just recalibrated my monitor with the lights on. this time i changes the moitor white balance to 6500 instead of the default 9600K. The colors are much better, but still a little bit off. I can live with that. The reds remain the biggest problem. reds look like burgendy and washed out. I tried oversaturating only the red colors but that doesnt help. I dont see any difference whether i print out the original image or when i printout the softproofed one. And yes adobe gamma is unloaded.

as i said, i can live with these colors, only if i can get the reds to look more like red.

I checked the printhead and its fine, there is no clogging.

Any ideas.
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 8:55 PM   #7
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If you want to calibrate to standard settings, you have to first adjust monitor profile, then adjust printer settings to match. This way you should also be able to have pics printed elsewhere and look the same.

If you are just wanting to have your printer and monitor match, and plan on doing all printing yourself, another way to go is to print straight from camera, then adjust monitor profile to match prints. This is what Adobe Gamma or some other profiling software is good for. Works great for me.

brian
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