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Old Jul 9, 2006, 11:32 AM   #1
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Hi guys,

Apologies for this noob question but I have just purchased the above lens and now want to buy a polarisng filter to help protect the lens. How can i find out what diameter filter i need?



many thanks!
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 11:43 AM   #2
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77mm--look here http://www.photographyreview.com/sf-...ctpagecrx.aspx

Robert
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 11:46 AM   #3
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Hawgwild,

Your a true gent, many thanks for the help!:lol:
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 11:47 AM   #4
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When buying filters, make sure you buy them in the largest diameter you need. Then you can purchase step rings that will allow you to use the larger filters on your smaller diameter lenses. Much cheaper than buying 1 filter for each different sized lens you have.
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 11:55 AM   #5
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Thanks for all the help,

I'm considering buying athe following:

Hama Circular Polarizer 77mm

[/b]Does anyone have any experience of this brand of filters? or could anyone reccomend me a good make?
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 1:36 PM   #6
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Filters are much like lenses. Cheap filters can actually hurt images by reducing sharpness, increasing flare etc. Get the best filter you can afford. Hoya, B&W, Tiffen, etc all make very good filters.
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 2:05 PM   #7
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if you are wanting a filter to protect your lens the polarizing filter is not the one you want. You need a UV protection filter. A polarizer is used to reduce glare from matalic and glass objects. But as rjseeney says cheap filters reduce image quality. Personally I don't use any protection filters unless I'm walking though a wooded area or in windy dusty conditions. Most of the time the lens hood will give your lens plenty of protection.

David
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 2:21 PM   #8
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thanks for the help everyone, I've just plumped for a Hoya polariser filter.

Caboose, I understand what your saying but I want a polariser filter anyway to enhance my shots, plus it would be much cheaper to replace a filter than a lens should I get a scratch :lol:
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 3:59 PM   #9
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Caboose is correct. A polarizer should not be kept on all the time. It reduces the available light by up to 2 full stops. Indoor/low light photography is difficult enough, and by reducing what little light you have, will make it even tougher. Also, polarizers only enhance your images under the correct conditions. It tends to deepen blues and greens, but only when shot at a 90 degree angle from the source of light (usually the sun). Removal of reflections is also strongest when used at this angle. When used indoors, or under cloudy skies a polarizer will have little to no effect on your image. Polarizers can also cause vignetting (as can any other filter) when used at the widest angle.

Filters are tools. Just as you want to use the correct lens to achieve a specific effect, the same is true for filters. Only use them when trying to achieve their desired effect. Using them outside of their purpose will lead to disappointing results.


I also do not subscribe to the theory of "protective" filters. The lens hood works as well, with less potential negative impact on the final image. Minor scratches on the lens have little to no effect on image quality, and if you bang a filter hard enough to break it, the resulting shards will likely gouge your lens element anyway. If you're going to use a protective filter, get a neutrel filter such as a haze or UV filter that doesn't affect exposure. I only use a protective filter at the beach or during poor weather. In 18 years (some of which spent at college ), I've never damaged a front lens element or filter.
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Old Jul 10, 2006, 3:00 AM   #10
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Thanks for all the advice! r

rjseeney, i understand what your saying re: tyhe use of polarising filters and their application. I would not intend to keep the filter on at all times, only when shooting lansdcape shots when i want to hgett a deeper blue in the sky etc. The most likely time i could damage my camera would be when i'm treking in the mountains, as this would be the time when i would most likely want to use a polarising filter it seems to make sense to keep it on for both enhancing my shots and protecting my lens! :G
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