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Old Aug 27, 2006, 10:01 PM   #1
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Hey all, I've managed to gather than JPEG's are compressed and the amount of compression is represented by a number between 1 to 12 (with 12 being the best). Now heres my question.

When a camera says "Super Fine", "Fine", "Standard" and "Basic" compression, what number are those? Does it vary by camera? (If so, could you give me the usual range that cameras use?)
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Old Aug 27, 2006, 10:06 PM   #2
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They usually use Basic, Standard, Fine. They sometimes have RAW and TIFF. I usually always use Fine, but I sometimes shoot RAW, but never TIFF. You should start shoting Fine, if you don't already...

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Old Aug 27, 2006, 10:31 PM   #3
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You misunderstood the question.

I was wondering how those standards (Basic, Standard, FIne, Super Fine) correspond to JPEG compression numbers 1-12. Like can I assume that Super Fine is usually 12?
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Old Aug 27, 2006, 11:18 PM   #4
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Morag2 wrote:
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You misunderstood the question.

I was wondering how those standards (Basic, Standard, FIne, Super Fine) correspond to JPEG compression numbers 1-12. Like can I assume that Super Fine is usually 12?
Oh ok, I understand now. I've never actually heard of that, but i'll look around and tell you if I find out. By the way did you order your TCON 17???

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Old Aug 27, 2006, 11:41 PM   #5
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I've not heard of that number range either, but for better photos I believe you want less compression (i.e. more of the original image). Often times it's expressed as a ratio; 1:2.7, 1:4, 1:8, etc.I use those examples due to the TCON 17 reference by shooting_rubber. Those are Olympus ratios with 1:2.7 being the least loss.
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Old Aug 28, 2006, 12:43 AM   #6
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The widget I use to make jpegs on photoshop has 12 levels but I don't think this has got anything to do with the jpeg format - it's just the levels that the programmer who wrote the widget put in.
Fine, standard and basic almost certainly vary according to the camera. You would probably have to delve pretty deeply into the cameras documentation to find out exactly what they mean. I doubt many camera makers even publish that information.
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Old Aug 28, 2006, 12:51 AM   #7
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Jacks, Jpeg 0-12 is in fact a standard, not just what the programmer of the widget decided to use (I have read books on photography in general that make references to that scale, even though they have nothing to do with post processing).

However, you are probably right about it varying by camera... perhaps I could contact Kodak...

Shooting_Rubber, I'm ordering my Tcon when I get my next paycheck.
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Old Aug 28, 2006, 7:18 AM   #8
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You could determine this yourself by taking a scene at each setting on your camera and include a TIFF or RAW. Then compress the TIFF/RAW in Photoshop at each "level, 1-12) and compare the resultant file size with those from the camera at each of the three settings. The file sizes may not be exactly the same, but you'ld have an idea of what each camera setting corresponded to in PS.
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Old Aug 28, 2006, 7:20 AM   #9
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I don't think there is anyway to determine how in camera compression relates to your post work saving. I always shoot at highest resolution+lowest compression (when I'm not shooting RAW) and save the finished image at the highest JPEG setting for printing.
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Old Aug 28, 2006, 11:14 AM   #10
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It is fairly easy to determine the compression ratio of Photoshop settings compared to what your camera is putting out.

Open a JPGimage in Photoshop. "Save as" to the same folder and name the new save "12". Select a 12 compression. Then "Save as" 11 etc. Open the folder and look at the file sizes. You can see where your camera falls in relation to Photoshop file quality numbers. The compression of a specific file is directly reflected in the file size.

JPG file size varies according to content. But if you compare the file sizes with the same image you can find out exactly where your camera compression falls on the Photoshop scale.

I have yet to see a camera that has as high a quality as Photoshop quality 12. But there are cameras that fall in the Photoshop quality 11 range. Most are lower though.

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