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Old Jan 2, 2010, 10:48 AM   #11
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Good info thanks. Is some kind of photographers pass required? Also Im curious about the fact there are no people scurrying about. The desolation look to this place is paramount.
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Old Jan 2, 2010, 11:07 AM   #12
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Definately a sweet shoot. I would love to go to a place like that.
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Old Jan 2, 2010, 11:44 AM   #13
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Wait, I just have to catch my breath…
… These are some of the nicest hdr pictures I’ve seen. There absolutely top notch. They remind me of a default background picture for Windows 7 which has fascinated me for a long time.
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Old Jan 2, 2010, 11:58 AM   #14
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There are two sections of Antelope Canyon - both of them are located on tribal land, and due to the danger of flash flooding, they require everyone to visit with permission/on a tour.

Upper Antelope Canyon is the one that most people visit - it's an easy walk and no ladders. There are a number of different companies that offer tours, and most offer two types of tours. A regular tour is about an hour long (or something like that) and it sounds like you are shepherded along by a tour guide who will (hopefully) give you some information about the canyon. Others also offer a photo tour that is longer (like 2 hours). I've seen reviews that say some of the photo tours are very helpful, suggesting shots and helping with all kinds of cameras. I've also seen many remark about the crowds and how not everyone is considerate toward tripods etc. In summer the noon sun reaches the canyon floor, people throw sand/dust in the air and take sun beam pictures - probably the most famous pictures of this canyon. I've read that you do NOT want to change lenses in this canyon! Next time we go, I want to visit this canyon also.

The Lower Canyon is only accessible through one company (it appears to be one family). It's also not well known as it was closed to public access for a long time. There are ladders and you have to be reasonably agile to get through some of the narrow spots (my Kata 3N1-30 bag rubbed on both sides in places), so it's not for everyone. They also offer two entrance options - the first one is guided and about an hour. The second option is the Photo Pass - they show you how to get into the canyon then periodically check on you. It allows you up to 4 hours to wander on your own (I spent about 2-1/2 hours). During that time, I saw 4 other people - two with the guide who went down at the same time (and disappeared ahead while I pulled out my tripod) and two others later on. I was the last one out of the canyon - they closed up when we left - December before Christmas is definitely "off-season" for the area. It wasn't warm, either - I was glad to have lined gloves and a warm jacket.

The light is supposed to be much better in summer, but I hate crowds and figured it couldn't be all THAT bad in winter. I sure wasn't disappointed!
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Old Jan 2, 2010, 12:44 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bynx View Post
Absolutely stunning. That ladder is so annoying in that it seems to be a desecration to this place.
True, but the ladder is useful in at least some to provide needed perspective, because these wonderful images are so other-worldly that there would be no way to judge the size of the formations without something recognizable to relate to. Having a person in the photo would do more to destroy the mood than does the ladder, which at least gives you a sense of how steep the walls are and how deep that narrow canyon is.
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Old Jan 2, 2010, 1:26 PM   #16
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Having gotten caught in a flash flood in a wadi in the Sinai once I can appreciate how fast they are and dangerous. I understand the necessity of the ladder(s) if they are susceptible to that kind of flooding. It just seems wrong to have anything man-made in there to spoil the perfection of pure nature. I would have put the camera on timer and included myself in a shot or two to give some perspective of scale. MtnGal I will be checking out those guided tours. Thanks.
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Old Jan 2, 2010, 10:34 PM   #17
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I do agree with you that the ladders seem intrusive, though I was glad they were there. Lots of people would really destroy the feeling, but adding one or two works OK. I didn't take the time to put myself into the picture, but did include my other half in one. It worked reasonably well at showing the slow shutter speeds I used - he was strolling away and there's quite a bit of motion blur in the moving leg.

If you do a google search on Antelope Canyon, you'll find the official website with information about the various guides/tours available. Amazing thing, the internet - without it I would never have figured out how to visit this very special place. It's not so much that its difficult, just that there are rules and details and it helped to know them before getting there (especially since we did it as a day trip out of St. George and couldn't afford to get it wrong as time was so limited).

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Old Jan 3, 2010, 11:21 AM   #18
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Does anyone know what kind of errosion formed these fantastic shapes? Is it by wind and sand-errosion or has it been dug out by torrent waters?

It's so strange and yet so beautiful to watch all these forms and surreal colors as well. Just mersmerizing - and I looked that word up, so I know what it means....


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Old Jan 3, 2010, 3:42 PM   #19
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I think all of the slot canyons in the western US were all formed by water erosion (can't think of any that were created any other way). The area is desert, not much grows there and flash flooding due to intense thunderstorms is fairly common.
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Old Jan 9, 2010, 5:46 PM   #20
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Awesome photos, very beautiful.
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