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Old Jan 13, 2010, 2:22 PM   #21
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When I saw your first shot I went WOW. Nice 3D effect with the lighting and focus. #3 looks pretty good. #2 background trees look similar to the outhouse picture. They are overly pixelated. But much better than your earlier posts of the outhouse shot.
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 3:22 PM   #22
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Thanks, Bynx!
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 9:28 PM   #23
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Everyone uses different values for sharpening, and I've found that different cameras need different values, too. Also, values depend on what you are doing with the picture - printing takes different values than for resized pictures for viewing on a monitor.

With my current camera, I usually do sharpening twice. For on-screen viewing and after resizing, I'll run USM or smart sharpen once at 0.1 pixel radius and anywhere between 100 - 150% depending on the picture (provides fine sharpening). And then I run USM again using something like 50 pixel radius and percent at 10-15%. That actually doesn't "sharpen" all that much - it mostly adds contrast. Unless there's a lot of fine tree branches, these two together usually don't create the sharpening halos you can often see in over-sharpened pictures.

Since I do two types of sharpening, I'll use smart sharpen for fine sharpening and USM for the contrast sharpening so I don't have to change all the values each time, but I've gone back and forth between sharpening methods and don't think it makes all that much difference which you use. I've also set up an action that switches to LAB mode, creates a second layer, chooses the L channel on the top layer and sharpens that channel only with the two "passes". That way I can compare the sharpened and unsharpened layers, and if there's any oversharpened trees or other parts of the picture, I can add a layer mask and "paint" them back to the original (or lower the opacity of that part of the picture).

All this sounds complicated, but the way I have it set up, I push one key, click the layer eye a couple of times, maybe click another button that creates a blank layer mask, choose the paintbrush tool and spend a couple of minutes painting. I have another action set up to change the mode back to RBG and flatten the picture, ready to save.

Hardest part is deciding what sharpening values work best with your camera (I have two cameras and they need different values for sharpening).
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 9:37 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
Everyone uses different values for sharpening, and I've found that different cameras need different values, too. Also, values depend on what you are doing with the picture - printing takes different values than for resized pictures for viewing on a monitor.

With my current camera, I usually do sharpening twice. For on-screen viewing and after resizing, I'll run USM or smart sharpen once at 0.1 pixel radius and anywhere between 100 - 150% depending on the picture (provides fine sharpening). And then I run USM again using something like 50 pixel radius and percent at 10-15%. That actually doesn't "sharpen" all that much - it mostly adds contrast. Unless there's a lot of fine tree branches, these two together usually don't create the sharpening halos you can often see in over-sharpened pictures.

Since I do two types of sharpening, I'll use smart sharpen for fine sharpening and USM for the contrast sharpening so I don't have to change all the values each time, but I've gone back and forth between sharpening methods and don't think it makes all that much difference which you use. I've also set up an action that switches to LAB mode, creates a second layer, chooses the L channel on the top layer and sharpens that channel only with the two "passes". That way I can compare the sharpened and unsharpened layers, and if there's any oversharpened trees or other parts of the picture, I can add a layer mask and "paint" them back to the original (or lower the opacity of that part of the picture).

All this sounds complicated, but the way I have it set up, I push one key, click the layer eye a couple of times, maybe click another button that creates a blank layer mask, choose the paintbrush tool and spend a couple of minutes painting. I have another action set up to change the mode back to RBG and flatten the picture, ready to save.

Hardest part is deciding what sharpening values work best with your camera (I have two cameras and they need different values for sharpening).

that is a good point about different cameras requiring different amounts of sharpening. i will also add that different pictures need different amounts of sharpening, even from the same camera.
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 9:44 PM   #25
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Completely agree that sharpening will vary from picture to picture. That's why I set up the action that adds a second layer before it sharpens - if I don't like the sharpening using my most common values, I just delete the sharpened layer and create another, or go into the history panel and delete the two sharpening steps. Or if I don't like the sharpening in just part of the picture, I can mask it out either completely or partially.
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