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Old Feb 10, 2010, 1:02 PM   #11
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its that pole through the middle that allows her to very easily make portrait orientation panos with an axis of rotation very near the sensor


anyways, the edit looks great mtngal!
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 2:09 PM   #12
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its that pole through the middle that allows her to very easily make portrait orientation panos with an axis of rotation very near the sensor
Ah HAH! So that's what I was missing - the rotation should be at the SENSOR! I had the camera mounted on the tripod wrong. The QR plate I have has markings for the centerline and markings on the L-bracket for center line - I think there's an indicator for sensor on the side (I'll have to check). That's a little something I hadn't figured out, thanks! I read about the nodal (think that's what I read), making sure you are on the right axis, but that part was rather above my head as far as figuring out how to find it. I'll have to play around some more with panos - a whole different topic.

P.S. The camera store who's camera that is will be happy that you understand the photography principles for their display, I bet.
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 2:14 PM   #13
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Ah HAH! So that's what I was missing - the rotation should be at the SENSOR! I had the camera mounted on the tripod wrong. The QR plate I have has markings for the centerline and markings on the L-bracket for center line - I think there's an indicator for sensor on the side (I'll have to check). That's a little something I hadn't figured out, thanks! I read about the nodal (think that's what I read), making sure you are on the right axis, but that part was rather above my head as far as figuring out how to find it. I'll have to play around some more with panos - a whole different topic.

P.S. The camera store who's camera that is will be happy that you understand the photography principles for their display, I bet.
sorry, actually i was just being silly and making a comment on the cropped picture of the kodak camera.

the true point of rotation should be about the optic center of the lens. or the point in the lens where the light converges and then flips. this will vary based on focal length.
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 3:20 PM   #14
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Oh well - here I was hoping that there was something easy that I was just missing. I did look and there's no mark for where the sensor is on my bracket, only the centerline of the lens. So I'm back to ignoring the true point of rotation and trusting software to line things up correctly. Which so far has worked out reasonably well for the panos I've been taking (I know that wouldn't work for a 360 but for it's OK for things like this).
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 3:49 PM   #15
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You make me wish a k7. What lens are you using?

Edited to add: you photo album is awesome.

Last edited by Ordo; Feb 10, 2010 at 4:12 PM.
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 5:31 PM   #16
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Oh well - here I was hoping that there was something easy that I was just missing. I did look and there's no mark for where the sensor is on my bracket, only the centerline of the lens. So I'm back to ignoring the true point of rotation and trusting software to line things up correctly. Which so far has worked out reasonably well for the panos I've been taking (I know that wouldn't work for a 360 but for it's OK for things like this).
btw, a reasonable estimate for the convergence point is just shy of halfway down the barrel of the lens. of course this is an estimate only, but its reasonably close.
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 6:17 PM   #17
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Ordo - Thank you very much for the compliment! This panorama was taken with the DA*50-135 at 50mm. I use this lens quite a bit as a walk-about lens and for travel, even though it's fairly large. It's probably my most used lens, a workhorse though not my favorite. I have a large camera bag full of other lenses, I have a huge weakness for sharp, high quality lenses. And of course, there's always another lens that I want/feel a need for. Every time I buy a new lens I think "that's it, I have everything I want." And 6 months later I want something else either because there's another field of photography I want to try, or I make the mistake of trying out a rep's lens and it blew me away, or I get tired of a hole I have in my lens line-up - my latest desire is for something between 24 and 50mm to replace the kit lens. I want weather sealing but the FA 31mm f1.8 Limited just keeps calling my name.

Dustin - Now I understand better the advantages of a pano head - I assume that it has rails or something so you can adjust where the camera/lens mounts on the tripod, so you can adjust the pivot point? I have one lens that I might get close with as it has a tripod mount (the only lens I have with one). But using a 300mm prime lens for a pano is only practical in a couple of places.
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 9:25 PM   #18
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Beautiful!
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 2:27 PM   #19
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Dustin - Now I understand better the advantages of a pano head - I assume that it has rails or something so you can adjust where the camera/lens mounts on the tripod, so you can adjust the pivot point? I have one lens that I might get close with as it has a tripod mount (the only lens I have with one). But using a 300mm prime lens for a pano is only practical in a couple of places.
yea, it allows you to adjust where your camera is positioned relative to the rotation point on the tripod either vertically or horizontally. it usually also has some kind of pivot point with rotations markings so you can take a photo at say every 30 degrees or what-not.

i was looking for some videos, as its easier to understand by seeing than just trying to describe.

here is some tutorial i found online
http://www.johnhpanos.com/epcalib.htm
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 2:35 PM   #20
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Click Story Here. You will find some info about extreme panning shots setup.
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