Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > HDR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 26, 2010, 12:56 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

I liked this first shot. But it's a touch washed out. I simply darkened the entire shot a bit with curves and it looks much better, and doesn't take away any of the detail.

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2010, 1:42 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
bahadir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Izmir, Turkey
Posts: 6,263
Default

No wonder applying a slight 'S' curve often makes the performer happy by popping the contrast favourably, especially in an HDR image, which retain a good deal of dynamic range without risking highlights easily blow or the shadows go pitch dark, as in your impression you revealed above. Good for you Chato!
bahadir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2010, 2:49 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bahadir View Post
No wonder applying a slight 'S' curve often makes the performer happy by popping the contrast favourably, especially in an HDR image, which retain a good deal of dynamic range without risking highlights easily blow or the shadows go pitch dark, as in your impression you revealed above. Good for you Chato!
Actually, I tried an S curve; simply darkening the image a bit, worked better. It's a nice shot.

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 1, 2010, 3:07 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
bahadir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Izmir, Turkey
Posts: 6,263
Default

A little of i goes a long way as long as there's the infrastructure....

Anyway, I'm adding one final image from my interior impression, which I thought a single raw conversion could convey. LoL! the topic turned out to be 'hdr outside, single raw inside' : )
I should add that if I had intended this shot as the 'middle shot' of a three shot hdr I would have exposed it differently than one could call 'spot on' ; )

As for the subject: a Roman columned sarcophagus dating to 3rd century AD.


bahadir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 1, 2010, 5:22 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Bynx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 8,585
Default

Nice shot my friend. I could spend a bit of time looking at this and the whys and wherefores. Such mastery of sculpting. I imagine it was taken for granted back then. But now amazing artistry. Some parts are pristine while others badly damaged or missing. The destruction plucks a couple of strings on my heart. Nice touch with the gentleman standing there for scale. I wonder who it was made for? Obviously someone of high stature. And a couple it seems. Too bad we have the missing heads again. Thanks for this one. Its always nice to learn, and enjoy the view at the same time.
Bynx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 1, 2010, 8:41 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,052
Default

Another lovely shot, I agree with Bynx in that the artwork is incredible.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 2, 2010, 4:47 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bynx View Post
Nice shot my friend. I could spend a bit of time looking at this and the whys and wherefores. Such mastery of sculpting. I imagine it was taken for granted back then.
At the time that this Roman place was being built, sculpture was already beginning to go down hill. A few hundred years later, Constantine was forced to cannabilise existing sculptures to create his victory monument.

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 2, 2010, 6:39 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
bahadir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Izmir, Turkey
Posts: 6,263
Default

@ Bynx: What I read between your lines above, my friend, is an essential to be able to deal with any branch of art; sensitivity!
Actually, I preserved the gentleman there for the very reason you mentioned which is scale, but also as an auxilary to the main subject due to his expression on his face revealing the admiration we share here.
Ah, for an artifact which has remained untill today partly above and partly below the ground exposed to many forces for almost two thousand years, I suppose, it should be still be considered in good condition...and the missing heads... god knows which 'special collection' are they in at the moment!
As for who it was made for, supporting your good guess: Eutheus Pyrrhon, who was no less than the archon of the city!
The depiction of husband and wife reclining on a couch on the cover of the sarcophagus which reminds me that of an earlier Etruscan tomb but in terracotta, perhaps hints the fact that Etruscans who established earliest prominent civilization in Italy once departed from this part of Lydia in the Aegean region of Anatolia as Heredotus also pointed out...


.................................................. ............


@ mtngal : Dear Harriet, I'm so happy to read your impression and kind appreciation through your 'good eye' on this image as well.


.................................................
@ Chato: Actually, in terms of art history, Roman art, whose scale was was set for splendour, is considered to be a good transmitter of what is known as 'Hellenistic art', which was set on kind of humanism we witness in sculpture especially; putting the human in the center of the universe fitting the ideals of the ancient world as in the motto of Olympic games. However, the growth of monotheistic religions meanwhile, were not quite compatible with this underlying philosophy and the upcoming downfall of the Roman civilization was also to bring the downfall of the ideals of the ancient world...

Last edited by bahadir; Mar 2, 2010 at 6:45 PM.
bahadir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 3, 2010, 5:19 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bahadir View Post

................................................
@ Chato: Actually, in terms of art history, Roman art, whose scale was was set for splendour, is considered to be a good transmitter of what is known as 'Hellenistic art', which was set on kind of humanism we witness in sculpture especially; putting the human in the center of the universe fitting the ideals of the ancient world as in the motto of Olympic games. However, the growth of monotheistic religions meanwhile, were not quite compatible with this underlying philosophy and the upcoming downfall of the Roman civilization was also to bring the downfall of the ideals of the ancient world...
Your description is good as far as it goes. But Roman Art was already going downhill at the time this place was built. This collapse continued, not so much because of Christianity (although that played a role) but rather because society was reaching a point where there were only the wealthy, who paid no taxes, and everyone else. By the time of Constantine, there simply was no Middle Class in existance. A society of slaves, masters, and the army...

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 2010, 5:05 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
bahadir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Izmir, Turkey
Posts: 6,263
Default

Chato, as a final note on this so as not to go off the subject while art history being my hobby horse, I'd say; keeping some quickly accessable ready made phrases in mind are very likely to hinder our true enjoyment of art while visiting such an exhibition. Certainly one shoud not confuse the progress in art with that of science or economy and there's no point in examining a work of art without first acknowledging the power of the visual in its own right, which is in the thousands of gazes caught by its surface followed by the resultant and varying effect in the audience as seen in the gentleman’s face in the picture which I included an auxilary element in the composition…
In this regard I quite appreciate a concise yet moving impression by Adrian Searle after he had visited 'Rembrandt By Himself' exhibition : ''Standing in this room I realised that you can't review Rembrandt. Rembrandt reviews you.'' Have a glass of wine and enjoy ; )
bahadir is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:17 AM.