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Old Feb 27, 2010, 10:37 PM   #1
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Default Can Chato Do This?

Here's the middle exposure of a 3-exposure HDR processed in Photomatix Pro. It's not really how my eyes saw the scene, but it's what the camera produced.
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Old Feb 27, 2010, 10:39 PM   #2
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Here is the Photomatix Pro result, with a little extra postprocessing in Photoshop...mainly sharpening. Can't say that I could produce anything close without an HDR program.
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Old Feb 27, 2010, 11:07 PM   #3
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Wow. That is stunning. I have yet to learn how to do HDR like that but I think I am actually having some success.

My A350 does a max ev range of only +/-0.7ev. That's fine for my original purpose which is mainly to improve all my handheld shots set at a low aperture (or is it "high" at F3.5 and F4) to minimize blur. Everytime I drag-and-drop a bracketed handheld set into DPHDR I see a dramatic improvement.

But lately I've been using a tripod and manually setting a wide +/-2.0ev range with a higher aperture (or is it "low" at F9?) and take 5 or more shots (only 5 of which I feed into DPHDR) with a remote shutter release and notice improvements. I think it's worth the time and effort to do all that as I'm sure you've done with this shot.

Great shot and edit!
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Old Feb 27, 2010, 11:35 PM   #4
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Print a few off. Then go down there with your Panama hat on, sit in a nice lazy chair sipping Pina Coladas and sell your post cards to the tourists. Id buy one. Very nice shot Walter,
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Old Feb 28, 2010, 1:27 AM   #5
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again i echo the above comments but i do have one niggle with this if possible i eould just tone the brightness down a little on the left hand side waves..... the pier the sun the sky are beautifully done
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Old Feb 28, 2010, 2:06 AM   #6
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Walt, your photos really give me ideas about HDR. Great work. One question, as I have a lot to learn... with your final HDR shot, can one make it darker after the HDR work is complete... in order to give it a little more realism of sunset. Just an idea. Like your work... it opens my eyes to details (like the building on the pier) to see things that still in a picture but can be brought out with HDR. Great photo.

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Old Feb 28, 2010, 6:57 AM   #7
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Ned, I know you're asking Walter but I just want to share similar thoughts I had of late.

I think, yes, you can make it darker after HDR work is complete, because you're basically "deducting" information when darkening and not "adding" information (from out of thin air I might add).

Thinking along the same lines -- and not really meaning to answer your question -- I also thought you can deduct information by brightening, too. Light bulbs' filaments for example almost always don't show because they're "blown out". (Not that there's any reason you'd want to but it does make the photograph look more astounding -- to me anyway ).

So I can deduct information from a photo either way -- by darkening which is really underexposing or by brightening which is relaly overexposing.

But then I thought, hey, the other way around should work, too. If I take a shot with some areas too dark and some areas too bright which are both needing information to show lost detail, I can add the missing information by also taking an overexposed shot, an underexposed shot, and combining the three shots into one. All I would just need is some software engineering wizard to come up with the correct algorithm to do so which evidently some already did.

That, in my own personal hillbilly definition, is HDR.
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Old Feb 28, 2010, 8:25 AM   #8
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Hiya vvcarpio, no worries. Many thanks for the info... PLEASE answer or chip in any time. I just new to DSLR and have lot to learn, as I put film behind me for now... HDR is just a whole new ball game for me... Seeing details in digital photos... wow, unbelievable... and then being hooked up on the internet and getting the opportunity to communicate in English with like minded people... it's just a great thing for me.

The original picture PLUS the HDR present new ideas to me, along with questions... The HDR brings out certain details, such as the buildings on the warf that were not visible in the original... but then there is the matter of being true to natural blue sky, the water... I tried experimenting with the HDR photo to see what I would do, I ran in to more questions... Then there is the info you brought. Again, the HDR does things I really like, but then there parts of both that would wish to incorporate to be true to the sunset.

Thanks again, nice hearing from you. All the best.

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Old Feb 28, 2010, 9:00 AM   #9
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I like both pictures, they offer different things. I do think that the blue on the left could be a bit darker, but you can always do that in photoshop or lightroom. A quick way of doing that in Lightroom would be to use the gradient mask feature set to lower the exposure and drag over the left side, that would give a gradual darkening from right to left.

vvcarpio - the common way of referring to aperture is "larger" and "smaller", referring to the actual opening of the lens. F4 has a larger opening than f9, so it would be larger and f9 smaller. It's very counter-intuitive when you look at the numbers, but makes sense from a physical point of view.

I tend to use what I get out of photomatix as a starting point - I'll keep the contrast fairly "flat" and then add contrast in lightroom, so I have more control of it. But that's just how I feel comfortable working - there are lots of other ways to go about things.
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Old Feb 28, 2010, 9:29 AM   #10
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The concern you guys have for the light waves rolling is due to the direct sunight reflecting off and lighting them up as it comes in from under the pier. I think it looks good and adds to the amazing lighting.
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