Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > HDR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 29, 2010, 5:00 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Posts: 72
Default

Hi Walter,

Allow me a personal opinion. The first two shots give the snow and ice an unnatural bluish-fluorescent "glow", as though it's illuminated from the inside. Almost like those ice caves where one sees daylight through the ice.

But snow isn't illuminated from the inside.

I feel that the HDR was overdone, because I can't imagine that the scene looked anything like this when you photographed it.

Just my 2 cents...
__________________
A good photo starts with a good lens.
Mark R. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 29, 2010, 6:37 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Fredrikstad - Norway / Europe
Posts: 1,954
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark R. View Post
...I feel that the HDR was overdone, because I can't imagine that the scene looked anything like this when you photographed it.

Just my 2 cents...
Your 2 cents and my own 3 cents should make 5 cents....?


Hello Mark!

With your allegation you have touched a rather 'week spot' with me, because - although I am a firm beliver in HDR-treatment and it's possibilities for some landscape-scenes specially, I tend to keep my tonemappings more on the 'natural'-side than on the 'fantasy'-side of the output possible with HDR-softwares.

Although I did go "absolutely bananas" when I first started using HDR (everybody does...) a year ago, the novelty of creating glowing fantasy-worlds in neon-colors soon wore off and gave way to a more sober approach. Of course, the amount or the absence of soberness is as always a matter of individual taste and as such cannot be discussed in a manner fair to all parties.


I'm not sure if you evere experienced a Scandinavian sunset - presumably not - but the colors in the panorama you are talking about are as true as HDR gets. HDR software tends to increse both contrast and saturation. As default I keep my 'color-saturation slider' in DP-HDR to maximum 70% and the 'Vivid-color-slider' to absolute 0 (zero).

In this particular series I have even downed the saturation-slider towards 50% because of the already strong colors present in the original JPEG's.


Name:  L10_03_06_0133_WEB.jpg
Views: 394
Size:  186.1 KB
This here is the untouched middle-exposure (zero EV or Media EV) of the left panel of the panorama in question.

Now, increase the contrast and you get this.

But, as I said before, whatever turns you on. HDR is not to everyones taste.


Have a nice Easter-hollyday!


...and please do excuse my rather helpless and at times faulty English as my mother-tongue is German and Norwegian and English is an aquired language for me, so naturally it's not perferc!

Last edited by Walter_S; Mar 29, 2010 at 7:38 AM.
Walter_S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 30, 2010, 4:22 AM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Posts: 72
Default

Hi Walter,

(Nebenbemerkung: Deutsch ist auch meine Muttersprache! )

My apologies. My statement, "I can't imagine that the scene looked anything like this when you photographed it", was made partly from ignorance. You are quite right: I have never seen a Scandinavian sunset. Some of the ice-blue color (in the snow shadows) is already evident in the zero-EV JPEG.

However, in the zero-EV JPEG, on the right hand side, between the bushes, the snow shadows are dark gray-blue, and I find this quite natural. Now you say:

Quote:
Now, increase the contrast and you get this.
What I don't understand, is why increased contrast should change a dark blue-gray color into a bright fluorescent-blue? It seems as if the contrast has also changed the brightness - but only locally, at the top of the snow shadows.

Anyway, HDR is completely new to me, so it's easy to be an "armchair critic".

Liebe Gre, und frohe Ostern!
Mark
__________________
A good photo starts with a good lens.
Mark R. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 30, 2010, 7:42 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Fredrikstad - Norway / Europe
Posts: 1,954
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark R. View Post
....It seems as if the contrast has also changed the brightness - but only locally, at the top of the snow shadows....


This is a side-effect of the HDR-software. In places of high light- / dark-contrasts, the software sometimes goes the opposite way, changing the values plus / minus around, creating local halo-effects, usually depending on the settings used, but sometimes with no way of controlling it. I guess there are certain hidden alogarythms (!!?) in the SW acting on certain information in the picture.

HDR is not everyones 'cup of tea', either you like it or you hate it, but it certainly gives us something to dicuss.....

Frohe Ostern und faule Eier!



...
Walter_S is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:15 PM.