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Old Jun 22, 2010, 5:05 PM   #1
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Default Frankenstien HDR

The first photo was posted several months ago. It was a single RAW image converted into 3 TIFF's. I used Dynamic Photo HDR, but always felt that is was to warm. The second photo is almost complete using the same RAW file but converting it into 10 Tiff's of different Kelvin ratings. 6 HDR's were made and blended together using masking layers.
Thus the name Frankenstein HDR. The main HDR used had a Kelvin rating of 3700. The second HDR had a rating of 4050 and the third was rated at 4400. These were 3 TIFF HDR's. Then I used three single tone mapped TIFF's to finish up the image...
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 2:37 AM   #2
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I definitely prefer the second result. Just to clarify - the HDRs for the second version were just using masking layers and no special HDR software?

I like the idea of merging different HDRs - maybe by merging the two above (at the same scale of course) you could get even more interesting results?
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 10:06 AM   #3
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Thank you for your comment. I only had 1 RAW file that was blur free. This part of the City Musuem is very popular with children and adults. Plus there is a pipe organ that causes vibration, so a 15 second exposure was almost to much to ask.

I made 3 TIFF's from the single RAW rated at 3700K and (+, 0, -) a stop. The 3 TIFF's were then put into Dynamic Photo HDR and that was the main HDR. This same procedure was done with with a Kelvin rating of 4050 and 4400. Those 2 HDR's were used in the bottom right corner of the photo. With a 3700K rating the poles and the rust on the slide came out a light orange. I also used the 4050 HDR for the middle portion of the main pole. The star shadow in the left corner presented a small problem. It had some magenta in it. To correct this I made a single TIFF rated at 3700 and underexposed it from the RAW file. This single TIFF was tone mapped in Dynamic Photo HDR. There seems to be some debate over a single image that has been tone mapped in a HDR program. Some call it a single tone mapped image, others call it HDR since it was put through an HDR program. To be honest, I really do not care what words are used. The 2 other HDR's were created for control over the highlights and shadows. You can only use a dodge and burn brush a few times before they start to make marks. I made a 3 TIFF 3700K overexposed HDR and a 3 TIFF underexposed 4050K HDR for blending certain areas underneath the slides...
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 10:30 AM   #4
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Thanks for the explanation. Only one possibly naiive question on the workflow as I don't use Dynamic Photo HDR, but would you not have got the same effect by doing only one HDR and then changing the temperature rather than doing it the other way round?

For what it's worth I think you can have a genuine, single-image HDR. Multiple exposures are simply a software workaround for current hardware limitations.
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 11:29 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinSykes View Post
Thanks for the explanation. Only one possibly naiive question on the workflow as I don't use Dynamic Photo HDR, but would you not have got the same effect by doing only one HDR and then changing the temperature rather than doing it the other way round?

For what it's worth I think you can have a genuine, single-image HDR. Multiple exposures are simply a software workaround for current hardware limitations.
The version of Dynamic Photo HDR that I use, does not have Temp settings like Photomatix. One major advantage Dynamic Photo has over Photomatix is color noise in dark photos like this. However, there is far less control when you compare it to Photomatix.

There is truth to what you are saying. I been working on this procedure for over 2 months now. It just offers greater control with far less hidden suprises when you start adding adjustment layers. I like to keep moving foward without back tracking. Yes, it basically is a single HDR and this procedure is a workaround. There are a number of ways that this photo could be processed. I have chosen a path that I feel comfortable with. Thank you Martin for your input...
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