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Old Nov 24, 2010, 4:01 PM   #1
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Default Cold cannons at dawn

Everyone knows I'm a masochist going out to take pictures at 05:00 o'clock on a cold winter morning - instead of staying in my warm bed...


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Early morning fotoshoot in freezing conditions, along the "trenches*" of the Old Town's (and we are talking about 1675 here) fortifications.

* instead of the proper word / expression for it, which I don't know in English...

See ya!

Last edited by Walter_S; Nov 24, 2010 at 4:04 PM.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 7:25 PM   #2
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As many times as I have seen this trench and its cannons I couldnt find this shot but doen in the summer. Didnt you post a shot like this taken in the summer? You have really captured the light here very nicely. Those two little street lamps way off in the distance really help this with its good 3D look.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 8:55 PM   #3
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Great shot...!

I'd hate to be the one standing vigilance with those guns through the cold, cold night...
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 10:32 PM   #4
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Walter, this is commonly called a "ditch" which is a shallow depression. A "trench" is like the ones you would seee in WW1 pictures, much deeper and narrower for hiding the troops, (most requiring some kind of ladder to exit from). I was wondering how you control the temprature of your camera and lens to protect it from the colder climate you have there. Do you need to let the lens cool off to prevent condensation, or warm up when brought inside to prevent the same?

Beautiful shot off a very historic area!
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Old Nov 25, 2010, 1:05 AM   #5
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- Thank you WIZZ for your kind comments!

- @ hkmp50 - thank you for you educational comments concerning trenches and ditches. Much obliged!
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Old Nov 25, 2010, 1:18 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bynx View Post
As many times as I have seen this trench and its cannons I couldnt find this shot but doen in the summer. Didnt you post a shot like this taken in the summer?...

Thanks Bynx for your kind words - and, yes I have previously posted some similar shot of the same area. Like the next 2 fall shots, from my days with the LUMIX FZ-28-time

Like:


This one here of the same cannon-ditch but looking north...









and another one, looking the other way, where we can see the same cannons as above, partly hidden underneath the trees.


BTW - here is another one of the original, just a bit bigger (I forgot that the resizing-engine here does blur the posted photos a little...).




Thanks guys, and have a nice day!





...
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Old Nov 25, 2010, 3:38 AM   #7
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I was hoping you had posted a shot from the same position as your winter shot here.
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Old Nov 25, 2010, 4:44 AM   #8
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I was hoping you had posted a shot from the same position as your winter shot here.

Damn! - You are hard to please, Bynx!

I'll have to dig through 65 Gigabytes of pictures to find one that is just right for you. You'll have to give me som time for this one.....

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Old Nov 25, 2010, 7:48 AM   #9
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Love that last shot walter, great feel.
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Old Nov 25, 2010, 1:05 PM   #10
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Default Cold conditions and condensation

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Originally Posted by hkmp50 View Post
...I was wondering how you control the temprature of your camera and lens to protect it from the colder climate you have there. Do you need to let the lens cool off to prevent condensation, or warm up when brought inside to prevent the same?...

Hello hkmp50 again!

I was kind'a buisy this morning to give you a satifactory answer to your question, Frank.

Now, I have been taking digital pictures in extreme cold weather for 3 winters in a row (this will be my 4th), and taking a few precautions - I have yet to come across a situation where my camera would get into cold-trouble, other than that the camera's batteries will not last for as long as you normally are used to. The cold takes it's toll in some more than usual or faster battery-drainage.

This was not true when I was using my Panasonic FZ-28 (3 years ago) and my Panasonic G1 (2 years ago) where I was generally using LiveView / the LCD to frame and arrange my shots, because the switched-on LCD generated some internal warmth (I guess - or maybe the Panasonic-batteries are just better in quality) and so kept the battery from getting too cold.

My Nikon D300 clearly shows some shorter battery-life in cold conditions compared to warm-weather use, even though I solely use the viewfinder to frame and focus and not LiveView (LCD).

BUT: Using the ViewFinder (as compared to LiveView) creates another problem in cold weather. The closeness of nose and mouth to the ice-cold camera will fog it up when breathing in a normal manner, as ones exhale contains a lot of humidity which will condensate on anything cold and freeze.

Additional horror: Wearing glasses, as I do, amplifies the fogging-hazard, as I may get two fogged barriers if I'm not careful! The glasses AND the camera's eyepice...

I have to control my breething in such a way as to hold my breath when framing / focussing and then step back a bit to exhale in a controlled way. Or, in order to stay close to the VF longer than I can hold my breat comfortably, I have to pout my lips sideways (into the left corner of the mouth, since I use my right eye on the VF) and deliberately blowing my exhale away form the cold camera, sideways!

O.K. - Here are my cold-weather procedures: When I am on a cold photo-shoot, I take out my camera and put it onto the tripod (I use a tripod for 99% of my shots) when I get to the location - and I leave it there - all the time, until I'm done and go home. If I move from one motive to another (within reasonable distance) I still leave the camera on the tripod, pick up the tripod and carry the whole shebang along, and set it up again.

Cameras (at least the one's I have used...) can take the cold as such. The thing to avoid is frequent CHANGE of temperature. Repiting in and out of cold - warm - cold - warm-conditions will create condensation inside the camera and indeed inside the lens if the difference is big. Also the front of the lens and the VF's eyepice will fog and even the LCD will look milky-white under extreme conditions.

As long as everything is cold - it's fine! Now, the thing to look out for is when you get back to your warm home.

When finnishing my shoot I just put the camera back into my (by now icecold) slingshot-bag and drive home, with the bag in the car's boot (where it's cold).

Before I walk through my front-door, I take out the camera and pull out the memory-card, which I put inside it's little container in my coatpocket - so I have it ready to insert into my card-reader when I get inside. I then put the camera back into it's slingshot-bag, zip up and leave the bag in the hallway (where it is a bit cooler then the livingroom) and leave it there.

Do not open the zippers or lids, or whatever - just let it rest for at least 2 hours. During that time the inside of the paddet (insulation) walls of the camera-bag - and the camera itself - will SLOWLY have aquired the same temperature as the hallway. No condensation! And I have my memory-card available to check my shots...





This is from a series of shots where I stood in minus 18 Celsius waiting for the sun to rise, when my G1 was on the tripod out there in the snow for 2 solid hours switched on - with no problem whatsoever!



Good luck!

Last edited by Walter_S; Nov 26, 2010 at 5:20 AM. Reason: typos....and spelling errors - after all, English is my 3rd language. :o)
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