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Old Sep 5, 2012, 12:58 PM   #11
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Bracketed shots for HDR should be done by altering the shutter speed. Increasing or decreasing will give you a greater range than a single shutter speed. And you shouldnt do bracketing shots by changing the aperture.
Would you explain your statement a little more. I thought a HDR was constant shutter speed and three or more different aperture settings. Why change shutter speed over aperture? What is the difference or advantage?
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Old Sep 5, 2012, 1:41 PM   #12
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The benefit of changing shutter speed over aperture is you do not affect depth-of-field.
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Old Sep 5, 2012, 2:51 PM   #13
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Here is a link to instructional tutorials provided by Photomatix the makers of perhaps the most popular HDR software on the market today.
Most likely, this will start a whole new discussion on which is the right way to do it.

You can choose instructional videos for some of the more popular cameras.

http://www.hdr-photography.com/video...php#nikond7000

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Old Sep 5, 2012, 3:43 PM   #14
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Id like to see a couple of examples of HDR images based on your broader definition. The examples should illustrate a broad range of light from bright to dark. Ozzie here, has demonstrated that your initial image is easily given the same look as your "hdr".
I am not trying to prove that you're wrong and I am right.

I was just clarifying that I understood your definition of what qualifies as a real HDR.

After reading Zig's link I admit I may have been mistaken in my understanding of how my camera was performing AEB. I was under the impression that it did this by changing with the exposure bias, a software construct, not by changing the shutter speed. I still believe the former is the case with 1/3 bracketing.

Here's your image, 5 shots, AEB by 1/3s

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Old Sep 5, 2012, 4:58 PM   #15
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On most dslr cameras there is an AEB button for doing bracketed exposures. On my Nikon D7000 by holding the BRKT button it allows me the choice of up to 3 shots from 1/3 fstop to 2 fstops apart. Its the best way to get 3 rapid shots. But if you need 5, 7, or even 9 shots you have to do it manually which takes a bit longer. For the benefit of Calicajun, you set your aperture, shutter speed and ISO for the scene. Then change your shutterspeed so there are no blinkies in the highlights. Then increase your shutter speed 1fstop for each shot until there is detail in the shadows. The shutter speed is the only thing that gets changed.
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Old Sep 5, 2012, 9:09 PM   #16
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I get it, easy of multiple shoots and control of DoF.
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Old Sep 5, 2012, 9:45 PM   #17
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In the case of 1/3 bracketing I believe its done by altering the shutterspeed by 1/3 fstop same as if you choose 1 or 2 fstop difference. You can check this by looking at the change in shutterspeed in the EXIF data from 3 shots you took using bracketed AEV 1/3 fstops apart. There is no change in exposure by tricky software.
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Old Sep 5, 2012, 9:49 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
Here is a link to instructional tutorials provided by Photomatix the makers of perhaps the most popular HDR software on the market today.
Most likely, this will start a whole new discussion on which is the right way to do it.

You can choose instructional videos for some of the more popular cameras.

http://www.hdr-photography.com/video...php#nikond7000

Zig
This is a good tutorial on using the cameras automatic bracketing feature. But not so good if more shots are needed than 3. To do that it must be done manually which runs pretty quickly when you get used to it.
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Old Sep 6, 2012, 6:18 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bynx View Post
This is a good tutorial on using the cameras automatic bracketing feature. But not so good if more shots are needed than 3. To do that it must be done manually which runs pretty quickly when you get used to it.
Hi Bynx,
I thought that the videos provided by Photomatix were worth mentioning as it clarifies the steps required and what actually is involved.

As to your second point, agreed. My previous camera allowed as many as 5 bracketed shots which was a nice feature. The Nikon D7000, as you know, allows for 3. At first I thought that it was major problem. But, honestly, for my purposes, the 3 shot HDR results are very acceptable. In any case, as you pointed out, it's easy to set the camera for more shots, if you so desire.
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Old Sep 6, 2012, 11:42 AM   #20
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Quote:
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In the case of 1/3 bracketing I believe its done by altering the shutterspeed by 1/3 fstop same as if you choose 1 or 2 fstop difference. You can check this by looking at the change in shutterspeed in the EXIF data from 3 shots you took using bracketed AEV 1/3 fstops apart. There is no change in exposure by tricky software.
well I'll be mistaken... after examining some EXIF data I see that you are correct the AEB mode is varying the shutter speed to affect even the 1/3 stop brackets.

BTW my Olympus E-PL2 allows me to do 5 or even 7 bracketed shots pretty easily, Zig maybe you're using the wrong one of your cameras ;-)

FWIW I was led a stray by my recent reading of how half ISO steps were software based and yielded more noise than going up to the next full stop. For some reason I had equated the exposure bias to this more than actually changing the shutter speed.
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