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Old Oct 8, 2007, 11:37 PM   #11
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It figures that Mac support is non existent. This is the one thing that KILLS me about being a Mac user. If you own a Mac it seems you need to know a work around for so many things. Anyway... I guess the search goes on a for flash based camcorder that delivers good video quality for under $300 that works with a Mac. I used the AIPTEK GO-HD for a few weeks and it almost made the cut but not quite. I was really hoping this Samsung was it.
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Old Oct 9, 2007, 3:44 PM   #12
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Beligerent wrote:
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It figures that Mac support is non existent. This is the one thing that KILLS me about being a Mac user. If you own a Mac it seems you need to know a work around for so many things. Anyway... I guess the search goes on a for flash based camcorder that delivers good video quality for under $300 that works with a Mac. I used the AIPTEK GO-HD for a few weeks and it almost made the cut but not quite. I was really hoping this Samsung was it.
You can purchase a license for 3ivx's software and it'll be seamless on the Mac since all you do is use iMovie or FCP to edit the files copied from the camera hooked up to your USB port...whew. Granted, it's fully Mac supported out of the box but all it takes is $20 or you can use avi2divx.jar for free.
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Old Nov 30, 2007, 7:27 PM   #13
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Bought the MX10 a week ago and returned it to Circuit City a few days later. They advertised it with 4gig of internal mem, came with 512mb SD card. Only the MX10A/MX10AP has 4giginternal, per themanual.

Ok, this seams like a great little cc. Has great 32x optical with good image stabilization, but slow to auto focus, color bleeding on high zoom on edges. The digital zoom, well forget it, must be in manual focus and on a tripod (as all full zooming should).Pixelationoccurs allot when shooting in shady areas and when panning in normal auto mode, no zoom. The colors are exceptable but not great. In door quality is absurd, the worst I have seen with normal out door lighting, very grainy and noisy, with some darker areas pure black even going on manualwith the white balance, focus etc,. I was also disappointed in that it will not record in 16:9 aspect ratio onlyon the camera LCD display and thats for all MX10 models per the manual. It will record with display closed to save Battery life and looks like the batterywill last the full two hours. Has no view finder. NTSC format only,no PAL. Will not take still pictures. No night light. Manual warns of using telephoto switch may cause back ground noise, it does. Samsung missed on this model. Guess I'll stick with my 12 yr old Hitachi Hi8 with much better pic quality and wait to see whats out there next year.
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Old Dec 11, 2007, 10:54 AM   #14
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I'm also interested in this camcorder because it's hybrid and very compact.

I was browsing the net and I found this article on SC-MX10
http://dkenews.blogspot.com/2007/12/...er-review.html

Someone can tell me where I can find this model at the best price?
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Old Dec 11, 2007, 9:32 PM   #15
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Actually, you might be surprised how easy it is to make the files from these camcorders work with the Mac.

The key is the codecs that happen to be installed on your Mac.

I bought my first Mac recently and I absolutely love it.

Of course, I still have my Windows-based PC.

I have many years of experience editing digital video.

The other day, I experimented with the .ASF (Windows Media Video) files recorded by the Aiptek ISDV2.4 -- a camcorder that might be considered challenging by many Mac users.

I recorded some 640 x 480 .asf (Windows Media Video) format video and accompanying audio (which is typical awful Aiptek quality audio) to a memory card.

I took the memory card and inserted it into a tiny USB 2.0 memory card reader.

I downloaded the free Windows Media Video codecs for the Mac from the Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...displaylang=en

Then I upgraded the QuickTime player on my Mac to the $29.99 QuickTime Pro:

http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPL...nMore=D3380Z/A

(This only required copying a code e-mailed to me from the Apple Store into the QuickTime player on my Mac, which activated the QuickTime Pro features.)

After upgrading to QuickTime Pro, I opened the .ASF files in the player and then I exported to the APPLE INTERMEDIATE CODEC, creating a file with a .MOV file extension.

I then imported this APPLE INTERMEDIATE CODEC file into Apple iMovie '08 without difficulty... ready for editing.

Worked like a charm.

So it's easy to convert even Microsoft Windows Media Video format files (including .ASF files) into editable files for editing in either iMovie '08 or Final Cut Express 4.

By the way, the APPLE INTERMEDIATE CODEC does a remarkable job of preserving the quality of the original file.

I just did a frame-by-frame comparison on a 20" high resolution flat panel display.

The possibilities seem endless.

This APPLE INTERMEDIATE CODEC is *included* on every APPLE computer.

To get the same value on a Windows-based computer, you have to buy the Cineform NeoHDV codec at a cost of $250.

Now you can use any of the new version Windows-based non-linear video editors (Sony, Corel, Pinnacle, etc.) to edit MPEG-4 and H.264 -- even without the Cineform Intermediate (Neo HDV) Codec.

But, in my experience, the Cineform Intermediate and the Apple Intermediate codecs are great because they smooth out problems with audio/video synchronization that otherwise can occur when attempting to edit long GOP (Groups of Pictures) formats (also known as MPEG) natively.

The downside to using the intermediate codecs is that they increase your need for hard disk space.

It also takes time to encode clips to the intermediate formats.

But the editing is much easier because even slow computers can edit the intermediate codec files.

Anybody who attempts to edit the H.264 natively had better have a fast computer because those files are processor-intensive.

What format does the Samsung camcorder produce? .MOV? .MP4?

I can help with specific steps needed to edit these files on the Mac.

Regards,

Private Idaho

Beligerent wrote:
Quote:
It figures that Mac support is non existent. This is the one thing that KILLS me about being a Mac user. If you own a Mac it seems you need to know a work around for so many things. Anyway... I guess the search goes on a for flash based camcorder that delivers good video quality for under $300 that works with a Mac. I used the AIPTEK GO-HD for a few weeks and it almost made the cut but not quite. I was really hoping this Samsung was it.
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Old Dec 11, 2007, 9:46 PM   #16
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By the way, the Cineform Intermediate Codec files have a typical .AVI file extension.

The Apple Intermediate Codec files have a typical .MOV file extension.

The reason they are easier for processors to edit is they are not "long GOP" formats, but instead are the easier-to-edit "I-Frame" format.

With the "long GOP" (MPEG) formats, frames don't exist independently of each other as they do with "I-Frame" formats.

"GOP" means "group of pictures."

That means MPEG video is divided up into groups of frames that depend on each other to properly show the moving picture.

These files differ from "I-FRAME" files.

Each frame of an "I-Frame" file is independent and can stand on its own.

With "long GOP" formats, each frame does not stand on its own; it is tied to the other frames in the "group of pictures."

Most non-linear video editing software attempts to get around this problem by creating new "I-Frames" at edit points.

Anyway, the bottom line is that very few non-linear video editors can edit long GOP video well.

Maybe the engineers will figure it out and make the software better in the future; but for now most software has a tough time with long GOP.

Regards,

Private Idaho
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Old Dec 11, 2007, 10:03 PM   #17
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Actually, MPEG-4 is a standardized codec.

So one only needs to have any MPEG-4 codec installed on one's computer.

I've never heard of the SEDG Codec, but it sounds like it may be just one of many codecs capable of decoding MPEG-4 video.

Or it might be a SAMSUNG proprietary wrapper that merely writes a special "header" for the MPEG-4 video recorded by the camcorder.

What is the extension on the files after they are recorded by the camcorder?

Private Idaho

yuckydog wrote
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OK, I did some messing around and digging with my SC-MX10 and MacBook and here is what I've found:

1. The Samsung MPEG-4 cameras use the SEDG codec.
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Old Dec 14, 2007, 4:21 PM   #18
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Except for all the non-standard flavours of H264, but most of these would be container issues. So a certain player/codec software might be required to play a file until other software is updated/repaired. Makes things difficult.

I wonder how come they could not figure an way to have an file format that both presented an standard data structure with standardised extensions (like which sound format, and it's stream/container structure etc) along side any customised data structure, at least most players would then be able to play these sorts of things automatically without needing customisations.
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Old Apr 3, 2008, 1:32 AM   #19
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yuckydog wrote:
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On super fine quality at the highest resolution, the screen indicates that I can record about 180 minutes on the included 512MB SD card.
Can anyone confirm this? Certainly with enough compression it's possible to record 3 hrs on 512mb, after all they put 2 hr movies on 700mb DivX CDs but I'd imagine 3 hrs on 512mb would look horrible.

I've watched some of the videos from this camcorder on Youtube and I haven't been impressed, as if the videos are highly compressed like yuckydog suggested.

According to this bitrate calculator:
http://www.3ivx.com/support/calculator/index.html

3 hrs on 512mb would be 324 kbps with 64 kbps for audio which would explain the poor video quality I've seen so far.
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Old Apr 3, 2008, 2:03 AM   #20
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According to samsung:
http://product.samsung.com/digitalcamcorder/

The MX10 records 4 hours of 780x480 (780?? Strange resolution...) MPEG4 video on a 8gb card. That works out to be about 4.5 Mbps (megabit/sec), which is about 1/3rd of what competitors from Sony and Canon record at so expect some highly compressed video.

They're nice for under $200 if you need a Youtube or second camcorder but if you need a family memories camcorder I'd spend double for a good Sony.
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