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Old May 18, 2008, 1:17 AM   #1
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The Kodak V1073 is a superb point and shoot Hybrid. Only a few manual controls for HD video:
1. resolution 1024x768 HQ (14Mps Divx5), or LQ (10Mbps), 640x480 HQ (8Mbps), etc..
2. Optical image stabilizer on/off
3. Autofocus - Once or Continuous

In the video mode, everything else is automatic. Even Kodak's stupid marketing-driven decision to limit your HD videos to 29 minutes per clip, just to be annoying...

Of course, if you want to take still pictures - then that is another story, as this is a camera first, and an HD Video second. Having said that, however, it easily outperforms my Sanyo HD1000 in low light, in color balance, and in size.

I put a video up at Vimeo, but they only converted the last of 4 segments.
http://www.vimeo.com/1028849
Download the raw MOV file to examine all the segments I talk about in my narrative there. The segments all play with Windows Media or Quicktime.

Mono audio, only U-law, but what the heck...

It has a DC input socket which will power the camera. This socket is 5V, with the same plug and 'transformer' as used by Sanyo on on ther hybrids.

Costco currently has this camera for $199, Circuit City $229...



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Old May 18, 2008, 8:28 AM   #2
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Thank you for Posting not 100% sure this is in the right area, but will get someattention here in the hybrid section. will relocate if neccessary

As for the video the brown is sweet the next color became less and yellow bland. the kids, and the adults to its left were not as clear, and shown grain . while this by the Smear is a ccd lens (guessing) not a favorite for me

It is deffently better than my casio in some ways but will have to compare oneday

More and more will be out on the market Hd and we'll see them soner then expected iguess

thanks for the info Fish
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Old May 18, 2008, 9:24 AM   #3
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Fishy, the problem with these Hybrids is that they defy attempts to categorize them. I suspect that 90% of people buying this camera will never record HD video with it, yet that is all I will be using it for :!:

By comparison with my DXG-567V, the Kodak's 14Mbps Divx5 HQ data rate gives much superior HD video to the 4Mbps H264. The superior lens on the V1073 has to take some of the credit for the improved image clarity and low light performance.. The DXG low light performance is really not comparable.


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Old May 18, 2008, 2:26 PM   #4
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thanks.

I tend to forget at times forgive me lol

a hybrid starts out as a Multi functional cam

mp3 film camera film camcorder voice recorder pc cam and a few others.



more and more camera based models are becoming video as well.
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Old May 18, 2008, 8:44 PM   #5
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We're always interested in other cameras but I guess the reason fishycomics is unsure, is because Kodak already has its own forum whereas the hybrid forum is for all the odd non mainstream products such as Aiptek, Jazzcam and DXG etc. although we do discuss the major brands such as Sanyo, Sony etc. as well.

Also technically i wouldn't call it a hybrid since it's really still a Kodak digicam with HD and a very interesting one though.

I am looking into a replacement for my old Minolta. I never really considered Kodak but might take a look if the still images are good.

I wonder if the 29 minutes has anything to do with a similar reason Casio limits their video to a pathetic 10 minutes in Europe to get around the camcorder tax?
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Old May 18, 2008, 9:02 PM   #6
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rgvcam,
The European tax is imposed if the camera can record over 30 minutes of nonstop video. So 29 minutes is clearly designed to avoid this tax.

But why impose artificial limits in the USA? That is crazy. The 29 minute timer only appears in HDV, not at 640x480 resolution (where it records a very nice picture indeed at 8Mbps Divx5). You can record 80 minutes of 640x480 at HQ, and even more at lower resolutions.

If this artificial 29 minute limit were not enforced, and even if Kodak's software is not smart enough to open sequential files (like the camcorders do) the 4 gig FAT32 filesize limit would still allow 38 minutes to be recorded at 1280x720 HQ (14Mbps) and 55 minutes at 1280x720 "long-time-mode" (Kodak's data sheet wording).

ps: the OIS works well - both for video and still-pictures, but the zoom upsets the focus, and vice-versa. This is a lens issue, which also occurs with the Samsung nv24hd).


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Old May 19, 2008, 11:13 AM   #7
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Trevmar wrote:
Quote:
rgvcam,
The European tax is imposed if the camera can record over 30 minutes of nonstop video. So 29 minutes is clearly designed to avoid this tax.

But why impose artificial limits in the USA? That is crazy. The 29 minute timer only appears in HDV, not at 640x480 resolution (where it records a very nice picture indeed at 8Mbps Divx5). You can record 80 minutes of 640x480 at HQ, and even more at lower resolutions.

If this artificial 29 minute limit were not enforced, and even if Kodak's software is not smart enough to open sequential files (like the camcorders do) the 4 gig FAT32 filesize limit would still allow 38 minutes to be recorded at 1280x720 HQ (14Mbps) and 55 minutes at 1280x720 "long-time-mode" (Kodak's data sheet wording).

ps: the OIS works well - both for video and still-pictures, but the zoom upsets the focus, and vice-versa. This is a lens issue, which also occurs with the Samsung nv24hd).

Yes this troubles me, as it seems to be setting a trend for limiting video on regular digital cameras. Perhaps Kodak decided it wasn't worth their while creating two devices with difference limits for different markets, however trivial it might be to do this. I am pretty sure that most people outside of this group, from what I have seen, don't tend to use their digital cameras to record very long video clips. So Kodak may have decided that 29 minutes wasn't going to 'inconvenience' the majority of people anyway.

I always thought the tax was supposed to be on those with AV input because they could technically be used to copy films so why are they imposing it on camcorder devices in general? I am guessing it's because you could sneak it into a movie and record it regardless of the AV input? A limit would obviously make it difficult to produce a clean continuous movie copy.
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Old May 19, 2008, 11:27 AM   #8
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Well, Sanyo has given us a clue as to what their marketing research must be saying about the consumer, by providing only 42 minutes max in 1080 and 56 in 1280x1720 HD-SHQ on their new HD1000. Clearly they are not envisaging them being used on a tripod at a typical event. So why have Kodak provided not just a tripod thread on their V1073, but a metal tripod thread? It is strange indeed.

I wish we knew how to
1. Hack the firmware to disable this 29 minute max, or
2. Let TPTB in Kodak know that not everybody is happy with this limit.

The problem I have is that I fairly often have to record 30 minute lectures, which may run overtime by a few minutes. So the V1073 has to be supplemented by something else. In my case, I chose the Canon HF100 (which does several hours continuous with a 16Gig card and my big BP819 battery).

The V1073 has a DC input socket, and will accept 5 volts from my 4xAA NiMH battery pack. This allows me to keep it alive for a couple of hours on a tripod (the internal battery is good for only about 40 minutes of continuous video). The Kodak's DC Input socket is the same as that on the HD700/HD1000 and I use the same power supply for all of them.


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Old May 19, 2008, 11:39 AM   #9
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You may want to email Kodak to see if you get a response as to their reasoning behind this for the US market.
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Old May 19, 2008, 6:43 PM   #10
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Video of this camera is very good, but I have a nasty problem.
Just sitting in a room, sunny day, panning without zoom. Periodically lenses click to adjust lighting and I see 'flash' on the screen (over-exposure). Unfortunately this affects video too and makes it unacceptable for me.
Short googling shows that I'm not alone, some people have had this problem with older model V1253. It does not make any sense for me. If Kodak's engineers can't fix this for a long time (what is really strange), why just do not disable, or make optional this 'smart' exposure adjustment (what I don't like anyway)?

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