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Old Sep 7, 2009, 1:55 PM   #711
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Owning this GVSfor this long period. the Action hd 1080P with focus hunting, the GVS as well shows this, in time.

More and more I see this occurring. I have the AF lock, yes but hardely used. I guess recalibrating is needed,well they say. newer models of other companies are on the market. And IfAiptek has nothing to offer, but a pen cam, they believe they Hit their peak, or are they holding back on a HD1080p 1920 model.
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 2:13 PM   #712
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New calibration over the Firmware? How to?
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 2:41 PM   #713
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To recalibrate, be sending it in to a repair shop.
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Old Sep 8, 2009, 12:37 AM   #714
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Thanks Fishy not good for me, cause mine is modified :-) May i will search through the Firmware.
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Old Sep 8, 2009, 6:24 AM   #715
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As i watch another members, or guests video, I see simular focal hunting, so why I am wondering if the GVS Model:
  • if Dropped
  • usage
Will eventually have the cam start to wear down, and these are the signs, of troubles, if some do not understand recalibration.

Electronics do need to be tweaked , to perfection at time, and sometimes the gears will go out of alignment, and cause certain incorrect shooting or fuctions.

As we know any White or Overcast background will make the cam unfocus more, especially with Zooming, But when on an background as your main source, there are no margains for error, it should focus , period.
the same would be said for macro.
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Old Sep 8, 2009, 6:25 AM   #716
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Here is another neat little find

MACRO, and AF lock, will work and all this time not one person mentions

so give it a shot , running Fw 2901.
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Old Sep 8, 2009, 7:04 PM   #717
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today the cam went throug twice a metal detecter, 1st time the inspector seen it, second time, went unnoticable, cam at secured places are notto be allowed. well i should have taken thesd card out. probably no harm will be done, as now I have the files on the pc, there are some curruptions probably nothing to worry bout. rather save as a whole, I am saving partial. a little longer but forthose take thesd cards with you out the cam.
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Old Sep 9, 2009, 4:21 AM   #718
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As mentione in the above post. the files do play, and work, I had to save a few render,and then combine the whole for a complete video to work inthe program.

I can eliminate the bad file if I do the process .

What got me was earlier to the day. how blurred, out of focus some shots were.

Will post up later, of what was taken. every day is something new wit the GVS, and if this is a continous thing what is one to do when the precious moments are there to film.

It is not just me or is it?
these are not test videos, they are a every day usage. So it is like turning on/off cam a few thousand times, film, etc, etc....

and troubles are found.
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 10:00 PM   #719
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Default Stereo Audio Fix

In this post, I am going to suggest how you might be able to easily fix the problem of the camera not recording stereo audio from an external connection. This is based on deduction, I don't actually have one of these cameras yet.

I think the problem is a software problem, not a hardware problem, but that it can be fixed with a trivial hardware fix.

If you plug a cheap mono mic into the camera, usually they don't have a stereo plug so what happens is one of the audio inputs is shorted out by the sleave of the audio plug. As a "feature", the camera probably copies the audio from one channel to the other - in software, instead of the correct fix which is to tell the user to use a stereo converter or better yet provide a menu option.

The jack on the camera looks like a stereo jack. If one were to inspect it more closely, one would probably find that it has 6 pins, plus a few others that are just for mechanical mounting. These pins would be:
- Sleeve - aka Ground.
- sleeve switch, shorts to Sleeve pin when no plug is inserted. This is
how the camera detects that a plug is inserted.
- tip - this connects to one channel audio input, probably left
- tip switch - this connects to one of the internal microphones. When you insert a plug, the internal microphone is disconnected
- ring - this connects to the other audio channel input, probably right
- ring switch - this connects one of the internal microphones when
no plug is inserted.
If you look at a stereo plug, the connections starting from the end are tip, ring, and sleeve.

This is not the only possible configuration, but it is a very likely configuration and it explains why there is a stereo jack on a mono input - the jack is needed to disconnect the internal mics. Another possible configuration is that there is an internal mux which selects between two separate pairs of inputs (internal mic, external mic) based on whether a plug is inserted.

So, to get stereo, you fool the camera so it doesn't know you have inserted a plug, so it can't implement the stupid "feature". You do this by connecting a short wire or a solder blob between sleave and sleave switch, or otherwise shorting the camera. If the camera changes the gain for an external mic input, it will no longer do this; it probably doesn't.

Another option, that doesn't require camera modification, is to grind a small flat, with beveled edges, in the right place on the plug. To understand how this works, you need to know how these switches normally work. A spring loaded contact is positioned so it will contact the sleeve (or tip or ring). When no plug is inserted, it is limited in how far it travels inward by coming into contact with another piece of metal which is the switch pin. When the plug is inserted, it is pushed outward and no longer contacts the switch pin. A good place to do this would be on a two input mono to stereo adapter. This flat must be in the right place, to line up with the sleeve contact. It must be deep enough
so it does not lift the sleeve contact off the switch contact. But if it is too deep, it won't make good contact with the sleave. This may or may not be a problem, depending on whether the other mounting contacts also make contact with the sleave and are connected to ground. Assume that the sleave pin is the only ground contact. In this case, it is VERY difficult, and possibly impossible, to grind the sleeve to just the right amount. These normally closed contacts require very little force to break the connection, but we want enough force on the sleave pin against the sleave to get a reliable ground. Even if you get it to work, movement of the camera and cord may be enough to disconnect the ground or the plug detect. Using an alternate ground point (i.e. on another jack) doesn't provide good enough shielding. So, for this to work at all depends on the jack having a favorable geometry which gives you some latitude. Gold plating the sleeve (after grinding flat - can't just buy one that is already plated) improves your odds a little bit. Rotation of the ground plug can be used to fine tune but would be hard to maintain during camera use. Shorting out the plug detect switch is much more reliable.
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 10:40 PM   #720
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Default Synchronizing cameras.

Many applications require two or more cameras to by synchronized.

- First technique is to use a clapper board. Frames are still not exactly synchronized and will drift further out of sync. Use this at the start of each recording. At the end of each recording, repeat but with the clapper board held upside down. In addition, record some ambient noise before and after - this is useful later in editing, for other purposes such as fill sound when you need to mute something.

- Audio correlation. Since the microphones on each camera will pick up some of the same audio, you can correlate the audio tracks between cameras (provided there is some sound) to determine the sync error
between each.

- SMPTE timecode. This doesn't keep the frames synchronized but helps you determine the time relationship between frames and drop or repeat frames in editing. In this approach, you connect, for example, your left microphone to camera #1 left channel, your right microphone to camera #1 left channel, and connect the right channels of both to an SMPTE timecode generator. You may get some crosstalk - check for this. You may or may not be able to get rid of the crosstalk by subtracting the SMPTE timecode signal, multiplied by a scale factor, from the other audio channel. Now, a portable SMPTE generator can cost more than the camera, though there are other ways of generating them. One is to use a laptop, notebook, or PDA to synthesize the timecode signals. Another is to use the NMEA output of a GPS in lieu of SMTPE timecode. The camera itself won't be interpreting the timecode signal like a pro camera might, so it can't use it to keep the frames synchronized.

- timebase stabilization. The crystals in the two cameras will run at different frequencies. You can trim them using variable capacitors so they are closer together. You can disconnect the crystals and determine which of the two pins lets you inject an external oscillator signal and drive both cameras off the same oscillator. The frames still aren't perfectly synchronized at the start and frame start times may still have a random delay from software, but may be enough to get the same frame rate and audio sample rate out of each camera.

- Genlock. Not really an option without substantial mods since the camera probably wasn't designed to genlock. However, it is possible to make a genlock replacement for the built in crystal oscillato, put this requires some time and skill.
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