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Old Dec 28, 2009, 6:50 PM   #1
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Default Help Deciding Camcorder(GVS, CG10, and HD-50z)

Hey guys Christmas money pays off haha. Well, I have enough for a camcorder and then some, like maybe $50 extra.
I was narrowing down my decision to the Aiptek GVS and the Sanyo Xacti CG10, and I found the HD-50z camcorder after my narrowing down. I really like that the GVS has a lot of features and inputs/outputs I like So thats why its still in the running. The CG10 is in here cause its cheap, And I have seen that its good in low light(compared to the rest of the low budget camcorders) So its in the running. And the HD-50z is here cause It looks awesome, aswell its in my sub concience that this camcorder could be a bad pick due to it being having ALOT of features that I wouldnt find in a cam that cheap, which might lead to the build quality falling. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. And I want to make good short films, and Editing is my speciality so I can fix some minor inconveniences.
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Old Dec 28, 2009, 8:07 PM   #2
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As a reminder, all of these cameras (Aiptek GVS, Sanyo CG10 and SPEED HD-50z) use a CMOS sensor.
Yes a CMOS sensor brings the price down on a high definition camera
Yes a CMOS sensor will avoid streaks of light on bright sources of illumination

but, you must know the disadvantages of a cmos sensor before you dive in and get yourself one of these cameras, otherwise you will be disappointed.

May I suggest one more camera? The JVC Everio GZ-MS120.. not HD, but it does offer widescreen using mature technology (CCD + MPEG2 encoding), recording to solid state media (memory cards) and offering a whopping 40x zoom on a Minolta Lens.

performance on a moving vehicle
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4HyOlaQBPg
zoom capabilities
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiQcDg3BeBg

You can find it for as little as $220 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001OMH1I2
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Old Dec 28, 2009, 8:18 PM   #3
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Thank you, But Im kinda leaning to the Cmos because, I dont want the streaking of light when I see lightbulbs, I have that glare/streaking effect on my editor, and I just need a good quality camera, The Aiptek might be the head of list due to the features, and mic input.
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Old Dec 28, 2009, 9:25 PM   #4
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As a reminder, the Aiptek GVS shots 1440x1080, since the CMOS sensor is 4:3. the image is then scaled to 1920x1080 on playback. Kind of like anamorphic movies on DVD.

Here's a clip a shot with it several months ago when I used to own one.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66uz-XvYPvA
You can see the rolling shutter even after stabilization.

In any case, as a videographer you know that with a good tripod and proper planning, you can get excellent video from consumer cameras.
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Old Dec 28, 2009, 9:48 PM   #5
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Yes, I know some people can make AMAZING and Stunning videos with a little. But Im afraid that If i pick a wrong camera, I won't be able to get a good quality audio clip that corresponds with the video. Im kinda worried, The HD-50z is unknown on the audio quality, the CG10 sounds good, and the Aiptek GVS has a mic port. So, I dont know what to do.
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Old Dec 28, 2009, 10:06 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subc View Post
As a reminder, the Aiptek GVS shots 1440x1080, since the CMOS sensor is 4:3. the image is then scaled to 1920x1080 on playback. Kind of like anamorphic movies on DVD.

Here's a clip a shot with it several months ago when I used to own one.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66uz-XvYPvA
You can see the rolling shutter even after stabilization.

In any case, as a videographer you know that with a good tripod and proper planning, you can get excellent video from consumer cameras.
were you in any zoom?
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Old Dec 28, 2009, 10:14 PM   #7
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Fishy to the rescue! haha.
Aside that, Does any of your GVS models have the rolling shutter problem?
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Old Dec 28, 2009, 11:09 PM   #8
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* Cheap
* Good quality video
* High Definition

Pick any two choices above. You can't have all three -- at least not for less than $500 or so.

In this price range I would join others in recommending a standard definition camcorder from a brand like JVC, Canon, or Samsung. You won't get sparkling clear "HD" resolution, but you will get real optical zoom, real autofocus, real hi-fi stereo sound, superior low light sensitivity, and superior image stability. Two models I can instantly recommend are the JVC GZ-MS120 (~$220) and the Canon FS200 (~$239). Samsung also has a few models which record video in standard definition (DVD quality) and then upscale it to HD resolution for playback through HDMI, which may be worth considering if you really want "HD" playback even if it's not "true" HD.

The camcorders mentioned, such as Aiptek, DXG, and Speed, will all give you "HD" resolution at a budget price, but will all suffer from limitations such as little or no optical zoom, poor or no autofocus, poor or no image stabilization, poor low light sensitivity, and poor audio quality (tinny sound with little or no stereo separation). But... if you're always going to have the camera on a tripod, in good lighting, and are going to overdub your videos with background music or separately recorded narration, then maybe one of these budget HD cameras will work for you. Just be aware of their limitations before you choose one.

And always search for and watch as many YouTube or Vimeo test clips as you can find. People can do all sorts of tricks to get the best possible video out of a cheap camcorder, so try to find videos which are taken in "real world" conditions and which have not been professionally edited with image enhancements, overdubbed background music, etc.

I have many test videos of standard definition camcorders on my own YouTube channel -- just scroll down near the last of my videos. All were taken inside Best Buy using the cameras they have on display:

http://www.youtube.com/vwest7ife

I mentioned upscaling standard definition to HD... of course, you can do that yourself using any good video editing software. Here is the result of taking video on a 10-year-old Sony tape camcorder and upscaling it to HD... of course the sharpness isn't there, but the results are interesting nonetheless:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsBw8yb49Ao

Last edited by vwestlife; Dec 28, 2009 at 11:27 PM.
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Old Dec 29, 2009, 12:32 AM   #9
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Thank you vwestlife for your large write up on your insight. I really prefer the quality and cheap selections, but yet, having the "HD" resolution would also be nice for that. But as you stated not under $500, Yet I would like a good camera for cheap, and have all of the quality. and im kindof stuck. So i might go with either the sanyo-due to the better low light quality's vs the Aiptek-which has the mic jack, 1080p/30 and 720p/60
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Old Dec 29, 2009, 7:37 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin31 View Post
Fishy to the rescue! haha.
Aside that, Does any of your GVS models have the rolling shutter problem?
Zoom or not, you will find Rolling shutter on any CMOS based consumer camcorder with no motion compensation. You must understand the limitation of a CMOS sensor and how it captures every frame of video, in order to see where I am coming from. CCD sensors capture the whole frame at once, CMOS does not, hence rolling shutter.

That particular clip was shot at the maximum resolution and zoom that the GVS would allow.
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