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Old Apr 7, 2010, 3:14 PM   #11
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Dear Private Idaho.
I make videos for YouTube which are over an hour long. Universities, and other Google partners have no limit on the length of their videos. All my YouTube videos were shot at 24p, or coverted to 24p in Vegas.

The average computer is struggling to show a HD video at all, let alone at 60fps. By using 24fps the user gets an excellent viewing experience (for the educational content we are providing) which places a minimum load on their computing hardware

For those who don't have a partnership with Google, there is always Vimeo, who have a rule that 24p video is largely left exactly as it is

24p video, shot with a good 1/24 shutter camcorder, such as the Canon HV20 or (better) the Canon HF100, or any of the Pro camcorders, looks very nice indeed -- for everything except sports action. None of the videos I have ever made have contained significant 'sports action'
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Old Apr 7, 2010, 3:46 PM   #12
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I know that universities can post very long videos because I work for a university.

Do you?

Is that how you are able to post such lengthy videos?

The reason I ask is the last time I checked, YouTube's generous UNIVERSITY exemption does not apply to individuals.

Has that changed?
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Old Apr 7, 2010, 3:50 PM   #13
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By the way, even though I work for a university that has an official YouTube EDU channel, my university YouTube EDU staffers advise me that they are imposing a ten-minute length restriction on all videos -- unless there's a valid reason to allow anything longer in their eyes. So I guess my university isn't going to allow long videos, in most cases.

I tried the VIMEO route, but VIMEO imposes a FILE SIZE RESTRICTION.

So, I ended up using this site:

http://movielocker.com/
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Old Apr 7, 2010, 3:51 PM   #14
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Forgot to mention...

The Movielocker.com Web site converts everything to Microsoft's SILVERLIGHT format (similar to FLASH).

So you have to have the latest SILVERLIGHT plug-in installed on your computer.
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Old Apr 7, 2010, 3:52 PM   #15
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By the way...

APPLE's *Apple TV* is still the best option because the final movie is shown in H.264 format for best quality.
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Old Apr 7, 2010, 3:58 PM   #16
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Also...

I've visually compared amateur digital 24p movies to 30p movies and often the 30p movies look better.

In the end, many other factors make the movie to a far greater degree than frame rate. Elements such as framing, lighting, and audio quality matter the most. 24p in the home movie realm is a big, fat marketing ploy.
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Old Apr 8, 2010, 3:03 PM   #17
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extremely well shot, well lit video @ 30fps does not look like a real, professional movie...

its like Soap Operas vs a movie, really -- the soap opera looks too smooth

even with the color & lighting being professional, 30fps looks like commercials and TV more than a 'film' i think
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Old Apr 8, 2010, 6:13 PM   #18
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24 fps is unacceptable. Hollywood knows this. All 24fps source is projected at 48 fps (each frame twice) so the audience will not become sick from the strobe effect of such a slow frame rate.

I am not sure why anyone would want to use it today, unless you are looking to emulate old film? Why stop there, might as well get rid of that annoying "color" thing too. Everyone knows B+W movies are best.......
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Old Apr 9, 2010, 1:15 AM   #19
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Unlike a real 24fps projection on screen where there are 'blank spaces' in between frames (basically absence of light resulting on 'black' spaces in between each frame), with video sources regardless of the framerate, an image will always be displayed on screen, so the 'effect' of 24fps is lost with consumer cameras shooting at 24fps. It is the same as shooting 30fps and then reducing the framerate to 24fps. Nothing changes as far as the video being less fluid.. but it does look a tiny bit slow-motion (because of the conversion from 30 to 24fps, but this wouldn't happens with a video originally shot at 24fps). Look at this. Is 30fps converted to 24fps, with a playback of 24fps. Nothing special about it. http://vimeo.com/2249234
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Old Apr 9, 2010, 8:36 PM   #20
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These days, 24 fps is used strictly for psychological and artistic effects. Even when viewed on a TV screen, rather than with a real film projector in a movie theater, viewing audiences still prefer the slower frame rate used in major motion pictures, because the faster, more fluid motion of 30 or 60 fps video (known as "high motion") is seen as too much like a "home movie" or "TV show" and is perceived as too "real-time". Even many large-budget American TV shows are videotaped using "film look" processing, in order to achieve this effect.

As Wikipedia writes:
Quote:
High motion is often criticized as interfering with the suspension of disbelief, and making it difficult to forget that the viewer is watching actors performing a scene. Some feel that this is an inherent advantage to lower frame rates, while others suggest that it is due to the historical availability of high motion only in programs that are least able to use the medium artistically, and the evolution of acting techniques based on lack of high motion. In areas where high motion drama is more common, such as Britain, viewers tend to tolerate the look better.
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