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Old Sep 11, 2006, 9:03 PM   #1
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Hey all, I have never used Exposure Compensation, and I was wondering how. Can I even control it in Manual mode? I know there are options for it in P mode, but thats the only time I've seen it controllable, help anyone?
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Old Sep 11, 2006, 9:19 PM   #2
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I use it when I don't whant to play with shutter speeds and I want to have faster shutter speed ...

For example if my picture is blurry, I will try to put it to -0.3 or -0.7 !!

I use -0.3 in many of my shots to get the best details in my pictures

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Old Sep 11, 2006, 9:28 PM   #3
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Ah, so I can't use it at the same time as I control SS and Aperature? Thanks.
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Old Sep 11, 2006, 10:25 PM   #4
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If you're shooting in Manual Exposure mode, there is no Exposure Compensation (because your aperture and shutter speed settings take the place of it since you're controlling both of these variables, although most cameras have a meter that shows you how your settings are impacting exposure).

Exposure Compensation lets you alter the way a camera's autoexposure/metering algorithms expose an image (brighten or darken it compared to the way the camera metered the scene). It's one of my most frequently used settings on most cameras.

A +EV value gives you a brighter exposure. The camera uses a slower shutter speed and/or larger aperture (smaller f/stop number) to get a brighter exposure, compared to what the camera's autoexposure/metering algorithms would have selected.

A -EV value gives you a darker exposure. The camera uses a faster shutter speed and/or smaller aperture (higher f/stop number) to get a darker exposure, compared to what the camera's autoexposure/metering algorithms would have selected.

If you're in Av Mode (Aperture Priority) and use Exposure Compensation, the camera will vary the shutter speed (since you're setting the aperture). If you're using Tv (Shutter Priority) mode and use Exposure Compensation, the camera will vary the Aperture (since you're controlling the shutter speed).

If you're in Auto (or other similar modes), the camera may vary aperture or shutter speed when you use Exposure Compensation. In low light, since your aperture is already wide open, it varies shutter speed if you use a -EV setting.

If you're shooting in Manual Exposure mode, there is no Exposure Compensation (because your aperture and shutter speed settings take the place of it since you're controlling both).

Correct Exposure comes down to the amount of light, the ISO speed, the shutter speed, and the aperture. A variety of combinations will produce identical exposure.

You use Exposure Compensation if you want a brighter or darker image compared to what the camera's metering would normally give you in the same conditions.

An example of when you may want to use a +EV setting is for a backlit subject, where the subject would normally be much darker than the rest of the image. Since the camera has a limited dynamic range, it doesn't know that you want the dark subject exposed properly (at the expense of the rest of the image). So, you can make the darker subject brighter for correct exposure (which might cause the rest of the scene to be overexposed some).

If your subject is much brighter than the rest of the image, you may want to use a -EV setting for Exposure Compensation so that your subject is not overexposed (making the rest of the image darker, too).

The camera has a limited range of bright to dark that it can capture. So, it makes choices so that most of the iimage is correctly exposed, depending on your metering mode. Sometimes that may not be what you want. That's where exposure compensation comes in.

If you reach the camera's ISO speed limits and your shutter speeds are still slower than desired, you can also use exposure compensation to get faster shutter speeds by deliberately underexposing using a -EV Setting. Then, brighten the images later using software so that they appear to be correctly exposed.

But, this will increase noise levels, just as if the camera had an even higher ISO speed available (especially after you brighten the underexposed images with software), and deliberately underexposing and brightening images later also results in some loss of dynamic range. So, don't use this technique unless you have to.


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Old Sep 12, 2006, 12:17 AM   #5
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And that folks is why I like JimC as a moderator.

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Old Sep 12, 2006, 12:50 AM   #6
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WOW... I feel extremely educated, now I know exactly what it doesand how it works.
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Old Sep 12, 2006, 12:55 AM   #7
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I'm probably too " long winded". lol

Short Answer:

A +EV setting with Exposure Compensation makes the image brighter than normal

A -EV setting with Exposure Compensation makes the image darker than normal

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Old Sep 12, 2006, 1:27 AM   #8
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I liked the long answer better... I knew that a + was brighter and - was darker, but I was kinda wondering too, why it wasn't available in Manual... the long answer explained that. Great explanation, I hope you are around when I have a question!
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Old Sep 12, 2006, 6:57 AM   #9
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So then, Exposure Compensation changes the algorithm controlling all exposure functions while ISO changes just the sensitivity of the sensor?
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Old Sep 12, 2006, 9:03 AM   #10
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I think so, from what I can gather, it changes the aperature/shutter speed to make a picture lighter or darker, in order to save you the time of changing those settings on your own!
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