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Old Nov 25, 2006, 1:52 PM   #1
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This wild and seldom seen Condorlissa bird recently migrated to Southern California and this one was tamed by my Uncle Herman Greenhut. He took it with him to Venice Beach and let him fly. It was an extremely difficult shot because the Condorlissa is extremely fast as well as elusive. I am very proud of this shot under the extreme conditions.
Fred

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Old Nov 25, 2006, 3:03 PM   #2
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Obviously, Fred,you were awarded the famous Greenhut Family Medal for Heroism and Photography under Trying Conditions for this fabulous effort.

Sarah
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Old Nov 25, 2006, 5:27 PM   #3
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Fred, what would you estimate the wingspread of this obviously unrepentant raptor to be?? Besides being a very nice shot.

Ken
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Old Nov 25, 2006, 7:07 PM   #4
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I have received two e-mails and three personal messages regarding the Elusive Condorlissa Bird The Condorlissa is found primarily in the tropics of New Guinea. Each year just before it senses the yearly rain storms the Condorlissas fly thousands upon thousands of miles to Southern California. Before I start getting correcting posts and e-mails, yes, I now it is not thousands upon thousands of miles from new Guinea to California but the Condorlissa is a very stupid bird and they get lost. Eventually they do make it to Southern California. This is germane to the continuance of their species. "Why?" you ask. I'll tell you. The Condorlissas mate only in the air and only during the rainy seasons. Since it is very difficult to mate in blinding rain storms as many of us humans can also attest to the Condorlissas must leave their home and fly to a warm climate to mate. They never land in California, they just do their thing above the rooftops and fly back, by which time it has stopped raining in New Guinea.

Ken, the average wingspan on a mature male Condorlissa is 12.5 feet.

Any additional questions should be directed to my Uncle Herman Greenhut.

Fred
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Old Nov 25, 2006, 11:49 PM   #5
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The angle of your photo makes it hard totell its gender.:?

BiLL

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Old Nov 26, 2006, 12:11 AM   #6
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bill2468 wrote:
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The angle of your photo makes it hard totell its gender.:?

BiLL

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The only way to differentiate between male and female Condorlissas is by its eyelashes. Females have them whereas males don't.
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