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Old Feb 3, 2007, 9:49 PM   #1
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Okay I broke down and bought a P880 recently and was impressed by the pictures (well some of them) it took. It seems as if I have to place this camera on a TriPod for it to take nice clear pictures. My Z740 on the other hand I could be driving 95 Mph and the picture will never blur.. Is my p880 defective?

Note: My p880 performs like this on almost every setting, and I have the latest firmware.

:?Thanks for in advance for any help on this one. :?


Examples of P880 and Z740:




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Old Feb 3, 2007, 11:09 PM   #2
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wildatom-

It is difficult to tell exactly what is going wrong from your post. Can you provide us with a sample photo and some info regarding the shutter speed and the photo environment, please? Thanks!

MT/Sarah
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Old Feb 4, 2007, 10:03 AM   #3
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I've edited myfirst post to include the pictures. There is only one z740 picture just for example.
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Old Feb 4, 2007, 11:00 AM   #4
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Hi wildatom,by posting all 4 pics together like this, they're being treated as one jpg.As such we can't read the data from each separately...If you could post each pic by itself, maybe we could offer more help

Dan


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Old Feb 4, 2007, 11:27 AM   #5
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wildatom-

In example #1 the P-880 was most probably being used in the "Auto" mode. The result was that you had a shutter speed lower than you could really had hold. Solution: Use the P for Program mode and select a higher ISO setting. When taking a photo, press half way down on the shutter release. When in Program mode the camera will display in the EVF and on the LCD screens the proposed shutter speed. If it is less than 1/50th of a second, the camera has to be put on a tripod, or you have to further increase the ISO setting.

In example #2 the flash range when using just the P-880's built-in flash is 10 to 12 feet between camera and subject. As the distance increases ove 10 to 12 feet, your photo will become progressively darker and darker. Solution: You theaccessory P-20 flash. It is quite an excellent unit and by using the P-20 flash your flash range can be extended, when using increased ISO as well, to about 35 to 40 feet. The beauty of the Kodak P-20 flash is that the flash unit and the camera communicate and work together, thanks to the extra contacts found on the P-880's hot shoe.This allows to fine tuning of the flash intensity.

A cheaper solution can be found in using a slave flash. However, there is no communication with the camera and the photos will require a good deal of set and test type photos.

MT/Sarah
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Old Feb 4, 2007, 1:56 PM   #6
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If possible please post the photos individually and with the EXIF data either intact with the photo or seperate. In this way we can tell what is going on when the photos were taken and not be in the position of guessing. I've seen some amazing photos taken with both of those cameras so I know what they are capable of. By posting in the way I suggested we will be able to tell if it is settings, user mistakes with the way the camera is held or a problem with the camera itself. Just a suggestion.

Dawg
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Old Feb 6, 2007, 5:33 PM   #7
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Greetings,

Sorry to see that you are having trouble with your picture taking.

There could be many reasons why the pictures are out of focus. To check, I suggest you place the camera on a table or other stable surface and use the Self-Timer feature. This will eliminate any possible camera shake while the picture is taken.

Later, when you are going to take pictures while holding the camera, a good stance is important in getting a good picture. Stand with your legs about two feet apart with your arms close to your sides. Hold the camera comfortably, but in a way that is not blocking the flash or the meter of the camera. If you are going to take a picture using the viewfinder, keep this stance and bring the camera gently to your forehead. View the image with both eyes open if you are using the viewfinder and compose the picture. When you are ready to snap the shutter, press the shutter half way to set the camera mechanics for exposure. When ready to capture the image, do it slowly, yet deliberately, avoiding any jerky motions. Note: Digital cameras take just a split second longer to capture the picture so keep your position for just a second longer than you would with a film camera. This will help you prevent blurring due to removing the camera from the picture taking stance too soon.

If you are going to use the view-screen to preview your composition, use the same techniques as noted, but do not hold the camera to your forehead. It will be a bit more difficult to keep a good stance, as you will not have the option of steadying the camera against your forehead. So, to limit blur, lean against a wall, rest your elbows, or use some other object, if possible. Try to rest your arms on something in front of you. The object here, is to make sure you have the support to steady the camera and prevent camera movement during exposure.

If the images are more clear orsharper, consider this process each time you take a picture. It will soon become second nature to you. If nothing changes,post 2-3 sample images, directly from the camera without editing,so your results can be reviewed. Try including one image per post.Those herewill be able to analyze them andoffer suggestions and I will be glad to follow through as well.

Remember, to review the flash range of your camera and stay within it when taking pictures of people etc. One of your shots was dim due to being out of flash range. Also, note that as you zoom the camera the aperture changes and the flash range will be diminished. Same on most all cameras.

Look forward to helping further,

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
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Old Feb 7, 2007, 9:33 AM   #8
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Thank you for everyone's advice.

I'm not going to use a trypod for every picture and I expected this camera to perform better then my z740. Here's one of the pictures I took, I would upload more but Steve's forum has a limit.




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Old Feb 7, 2007, 9:44 AM   #9
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The forum has a limit using their uploader but you can reply to your own post and upload about as many as you wish in this way. Just be sure to put at least a number like #2 or a small description above the photo. I've uploaded 20 photos in one thread this way!

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Old Feb 7, 2007, 11:29 AM   #10
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wildatom-

Perhaps it is just me, but I did not see any sample that you posted. Was I missing something?

MT/Sarah
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