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Old Apr 25, 2007, 7:39 AM   #1
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Helo.

I have a Kodak P880 and a dcr250 add-on macro lens, and the issue is that the dcr250 partially blocks the camera's flash, which makes it unusable by default. This is Ok for indoor shots, where I can have other light sources and a tripod setup. Now however, I'd like to use this macro lens outdoors, which means that I need a flash. Thus, I'd like to fish for some info,

Firstly- Has anyone seen / made any sort of diffuser (homemade or not) for the dcr250? I've only found a couple of textual references, no pictures, so I don't really know how it'd look. The pics of home made diffusers I've seen are like satellite dishes mounted on the lens barrel of the camera, apparently blocking the flash. Would the principle be the same when using an add-on lens like the dcr250?

Secondly- As no flash is allowed in the 'super closeup' scene mode, one needs to use the 'closeup' (flower) one, or go for one of the more manual programs and set the focus to macro / use manual focus. Can a close-up focus equal to the 'super closeup' scene be achieved manually? My results so far point to 'no', but it has to be possible and I'm likely just not doing it right.


(Additionally, I suppoe adding the p20 flash to the p880 wouldn't do much when using the dcr250, as that flash would also be partially blocked?)

If you managed to read all that then thanks : )



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Old Apr 25, 2007, 2:47 PM   #2
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The P20 might be some help because it sits higher and therefore less in line with the aux lens. You'd probably have to try it to see if that's enough. The P880 also has an external flash synch connector so you could use a completelyoff-camera flash.
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Old Apr 27, 2007, 8:56 AM   #3
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Greetings,

Yes, the P20 may be what you need as it can talk to the camera in a bidirectional mode (camera and flash communicating). Take your camera along to a camera store and try some of the flashes they have available. Consider those that have a reflector built in so you can control the light.

The P20 should be high enough on the camera flash shoe that it will not be blocked by the accessory lens you have. If you are doing close ups, the reflector feature will be an aid.

Talk to you soon.

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
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Old Apr 27, 2007, 11:53 AM   #4
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Not sure if my post on Dpreview helps you.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=23000865

I do not use scene modes....I either use Program mode or Aperture Priority modes, with Normal AutoFocus..

John.

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Old Apr 27, 2007, 12:18 PM   #5
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Greetings,

Your shots look pretty good.

I still believe that a reflector may help, but off camera options would be my first choice if I was working with tabletop subjects like the one shown in your example.

What is your eventual goal? Do you shoot a lot of table tops, etc.?

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
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Old Apr 27, 2007, 1:14 PM   #6
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Ronbaird wrote:
Quote:
Greetings,

Your shots look pretty good.

I still believe that a reflector may help, but off camera options would be my first choice if I was working with tabletop subjects like the one shown in your example.

What is your eventual goal? Do you shoot a lot of table tops, etc.?

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
Ron, I never take tabletop shots.....except for these examples.....I have both the P880 and DCR-250 macro lens and was simply trying to help narrow down the issue(s) that this forum member is experiencing. I also have the P850 and have found this camera to be a better fit with the Raynox close-up lens since vignetting is eliminated at 6x+ zoom....in fact, with the P850 the Raynox DCR-150 (less magnification than DCR-250) is a better fit. My close-up work is done outdoors without a flash.

John...
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Old Apr 27, 2007, 1:18 PM   #7
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Greetings,

Sounds like you have a great nature setup. I appreciate the clarity in your message.

Ron B
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Old Apr 29, 2007, 6:56 AM   #8
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jpfromoh wrote:
Quote:
Ronbaird wrote:
Quote:
Greetings,

Your shots look pretty good.

I still believe that a reflector may help, but off camera options would be my first choice if I was working with tabletop subjects like the one shown in your example.

What is your eventual goal? Do you shoot a lot of table tops, etc.?

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
Ron, I never take tabletop shots.....except for these examples.....I have both the P880 and DCR-250 macro lens and was simply trying to help narrow down the issue(s) that this forum member is experiencing. I also have the P850 and have found this camera to be a better fit with the Raynox close-up lens since vignetting is eliminated at 6x+ zoom....in fact, with the P850 the Raynox DCR-150 (less magnification than DCR-250) is a better fit. My close-up work is done outdoors without a flash.

John...
Ron,perhaps of interest...I decided to take a couple of pics of a dead dandellionwith P850 and Raynox DCR-150 close-up lens, one with onboard flash and the other without. No flash gets better color representation, exposure and depth.

FLASH

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n...64000001-9.jpg

NO FLASH

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n...64000002-8.jpg


John....
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Old Apr 30, 2007, 9:59 AM   #9
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Greetings,

Very interesting shots, John, you have a nice eye and a good setup.

Of course the exposure is going to change and the color maychange based on composition as well.There are a number of settings that are made when you go to a flash setting and they will change again when you go to fill flash.

One thing that I bring along with me when I am shooting naturesubjects is a black,white, and medium gray card set. I can insert thecard into the scene to bring out whatever subject I may be shooting and also control theexposurebased on the quality of the light. If not a natural requirement these manipulations will result in some great results.

For me, Ialways use flash insuch situations, save for insects and animals. You usually onlyget one chance if you use a flash with them.

Regardless, looks like you have it down pretty good.

Talk to you soon,

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
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