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Old Jul 30, 2007, 12:09 PM   #1
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Hi there.
I am relatively new to digital photogtaphy, I bought about a a C643 about a year ago. Overall nice camera but in some aspects it sucks.

For example, for night indoor pictures, setting tungsten or fluorescent in auto mode, as well as for the preset indoor modes, pictures usually result yellowish or blueish, like if the pics were "burned", do not know how to describe it. What are the optimal settings for night indoor pics? (like tinkering with ISO modes, aperture and stuff...)

On the other hand, outdoor shiny days are PERFECT, no matter what the mode is set.

Another question: Is it possible to transfer pics to a computer without using the Kodak software?

Thanxs a lot.
BTW site is SUPERB, really cool. I am having a great time here. Thank you again.

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Old Aug 2, 2007, 10:13 AM   #2
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Greetings,

Check your white balance setting and change it to the type of lighting in which you are going to be taking pictures. The camera features settings for auto, daylight, tungsten, fluorescent. Once you turn off the camera I believe it will reset to auto. Give it a try, it should improve your results.

The yellow appearance to your images is due to the tungsten lighting. This is related to the kelvin temperature rating. It measures the temperature that a piece of tungsten steel burns. At 3200 it is yellowish, but it changes at the temperature increases. When you get up to around 5000 or more, it approaches daylight.

Other light sourcesare related to the excitement of gases as in flourescent. Some will change the light to a different a bluish or green color. If you stand at a vantage point that over looks a city, you can see the differences in these light sources.

So, be sure to set your camera accordingly. It will improve your results.

Talk to you soon,

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
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Old Aug 2, 2007, 9:03 PM   #3
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toxique-

Ron gave you a very good explanation concerning white balance. Keep in mind that if the needed white balance correction is not too great it can be corrected a bit with photo editing software, such asa free program download from www.google.comcalled Picasa.

Under exposure can also cause some color casts as well. So you might want to check what ISO speed was used by the camera. Alternatively, you can post your picture here and we can analyze it for you and determine the ISO speed that your camera used.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 3, 2007, 1:01 AM   #4
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Ronbaird wrote:
Quote:
...tungsten lighting. This is related to the kelvin temperature rating. It measures the temperature that a piece of tungsten steel burns. At 3200 it is yellowish, but it changes at the temperature increases. When you get up to around 5000 or more, it approaches daylight.
The colour of tungsten lighting is actually nothing to do with 'burning' (which is the temperature at which an object will spontaneously ignite in air, cf 'Fahrenheit 451'). If you could ignite tungsten itself in oxygen, the flames would probably be a different colour, related to the emission spectrum of tungsten atoms.

Old-fashioned flashbulbs used that principle with flammable metal wire in oxygen in a tinted envelopeto simulate tungsten lighting or daylight.

'Tungsten steel' is a very hard iron alloy used for making tools, which would in fact burn in oxygen if you got it hot enough, butnot necessarily at that temperature.

The colour of tungsten lighting isdue to theradiation from electrically resistance-heated tungsten wire elements in incandescent light bulbs. The bulbs arefilled with argon to suppress evaporation of tungsten atoms from the hot wire. Tungsten is used because of its very melting point.

The 'colourtemperature' of a light sourceis actually the absolute (Kelvin) temperature of the surface emitting the light. A 'black body' radiates energy with a spectrum related to temperature, so that its colour as perceived by eye (or other suitable sensor) is actually used to measure the temperature, as in... ...

...pyrometerspointed at open furnace doors;

...thermal imaging cameras pointed at persons or poorly insulated houses or search areas in rescue operations;

...the eyes of blacksmiths and metallurgists performing metal-working;

...astronomers using optical instruments to study stars and interstellar objects, when lines missing from the black-body spectrum allow chemical analysis.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_bodyand http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colour_temperature.

The human eye automatically 'white balances', adjusting to what memory expects 'white' objects to look like in everyday life. 'Whitebalance' in cameras simulates the same operation.Both are easilyfooled, as we often see.Sometimes we like the simulations, as in sunset photographs, and sometimes we don't, when the results aren't what our brains perceived at the time.

Pedantry rules, OK! Alan T


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Old Aug 10, 2007, 4:05 PM   #5
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Hi guys.
Thanx a lot for your useful advices advices.

Best regards.

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