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Old Aug 15, 2008, 2:09 AM   #21
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Based on this and other photographs displayed in this forum, i have decided to buy kodak z712, bypassing my strong temptation for panasonic dmc fz 8 and fuji s8100. Friends still advise to stick with fuji, but results of kodak tend to pull me back. Is my choice appropriate?

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Old Aug 15, 2008, 2:48 AM   #22
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Certainly the Kodak Z-712 offers a lot for its rather small price. The Z-712 is selling her in the USA for less than $(US) 200.00. The Z-712 is an excellent all around camera. However, if you can tell us more about the photos that you normally take, we could make a more accurate evaluation.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 15, 2008, 2:52 AM   #23
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shujashakir wrote:
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Based on this and other photographs displayed in this forum, ....
Bear in mind that images displayed here have, of necessity, all been post-processed at least by resizing, and often by some degree of sharpening as well, for web display. I urge you to try & inspect some results from these cameras as original full-size files, or as big prints, to enable a valid comparison.

My local camera shop has a big folder on the counter,containing A3 sized prints from each of the cameras they recommend. They have been recommending the Z*12is series of cameras ever since the Z612, and as the Z1012is is now the same price as I paid for my Z712is in May 2007, I'm thinking of buying one so that I have a backup camera.

Also bear in mind that the in-camera jpg processing may include more or less sharpening, which may or may not be adjustable. If perceived sharpness is important, conclusions on 'the best camera' could be different if you're willing to do final sharpening yourself (at the correct final image size) in post-processing.

I was astonished to find myslef in this thread already, until I realised it's a year old!

Good luck!,
Alan T

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Old Aug 15, 2008, 12:36 PM   #24
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Alan T wrote:
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Also bear in mind that the in-camera jpg processing may include more or less sharpening, which may or may not be adjustable. If perceived sharpness is important, conclusions on 'the best camera' could be different if you're willing to do final sharpening yourself (at the correct final image size) in post-processing.

Good luck!,
Alan T
Concur with Alan T.'s comment on final sharpening at the final image size. Z*12 have adjustable in-camera sharpening but Kodak's default (middle) setting, while a bit more aggressive than the P series is still relatively gentle. This leaves room for the user to fine tune the final sharpening to suit the individual photo based on subject and purpose.

Virtually all my Z612 photos I've posted in this forum have been slightly sharpening prior to posting using IrfanView. I have experimented using the Z612's high sharpness setting and really prefer the results with IrfanView. The Z612's sharpening seems to work very aggressively on large objects while doing nothing on the medium fine detailswhereas IrfanView acts fairly equally down to afairly fine detail and its aggressiveness is adjustable.

A. C.


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Old Aug 15, 2008, 5:09 PM   #25
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ac, it's a good job this thread has been resurrected. I don't think I have adjustable sharpening on my Z712 (or maybe I haven't found it yet). Any additional sharpening I apply later.

It's not in the menu system anywhere I can find it. I have turned saturation up to 'High color' (which isn't very high), because it looks more like the real world outside my windows.

There are detail differences between the successor models of this series. Is this one of them?
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Old Aug 16, 2008, 11:35 PM   #26
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According to page 30 (pdf pg. 36) of the extended manual Sharpness is the next item after the Color settings on the Z712. What the manual doesn't tell you, if it is like my Z612 is that you have to be in PASM while you're in the menu to see that setting.

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Old Aug 17, 2008, 6:29 AM   #27
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Quite right, ac. Apologies for pestering you (again)!

Obviously it's so long ago (about 15 months) that I set sharpening to 'Normal', that my 59-year old memory can't cope. I need an external backup USB brain. I'll experiment with switching it off (sharpening, not my brain) for a while, and doing sharpening in one go later, for screen or for web or for print. I will have done these experiments when I got the camera, but have forgotten the results.

Sorry, folks, if I misled anyone.

On another Z*12 issue, I seldom use any of the auto modes, preferring aperture or shutter priority, usually at -0.3EV, but adjusted by eye when necessary. Even when I use 'P' mode for flash shots, I still turn the exposure down a little, because the default settings look a little overexposed to me.

The only 'Scene' mode I use occasionally is 'panorama', and I have to fool the metering every time by exposing for the sky if I'm to avoid an overexposed result, because it doesn't offer EV correction in that mode.

I suspect this exposure setting may be fashion and my taste, rather than a 'feature' of my particular specimen, because I note that many friends' digicam shots, usually in their auto modes, look overexposed and consequently a bit washed out and desaturated to me.Has anyone else noticed this? When I bracket exposures, I start from -0.3EV, and invariably find that the 0.0EV image is overexposed to my eye. It doesn't seem to matter much whether I use averaged, centre-weighted or (so-called) spotmetering, the camera always thinks brighter than I do. The problem's not so noticeable in brightly sunlit conditions, so I hypothesise that manufacturers optimise for holiday snaps in sunny places, unlike misty Scottish or Welsh mountains.

However, I note that ac's and Sarah Joyce's images invariably look beautifully exposed to me.
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Old Aug 17, 2008, 10:27 AM   #28
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I've found less sharpening is more with my Kodaks and would rather do the sharpening in post processing as there is more control and more ways to do it. The camera does it in sledgehammer fashion and PP does it with a feather. My DX6490 exposes most shots well but my K10D I need some exposure compensation in the negative side to properly expose the shots.

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Old Aug 17, 2008, 2:39 PM   #29
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bigdawg wrote:
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...sharpening....The camera does it in sledgehammer fashion...
Interestingly, when posting the second image in thread at...

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=85

...just now, I realised that my original is quite distinctly oversharpened along the descending skyline of the pointed peak, straight from the camera. The resized one I've posted there has had a little USM applied, but the original looks much the same.

I never noticed this sort of thing until today, posssibly because my peaks are seldom against a blue sky (see the preceding picture). Here's a clip from the original Z712 7Mpix image with 'standard' sharpening.
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Old Aug 17, 2008, 3:26 PM   #30
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I agree with BigDwag-

Sharpening is best done in your photo editing software. You have much better control in a photo editor.

Sarah Joyce
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