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Old Dec 15, 2008, 7:31 AM   #1
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I just got a kodak Z8612 IS (12X optical zoom). I went for this cam because it was the only one with 12X zoom at this price.

In Auto mode (point and shoot mode) the images are bright, its cant manage the bright sky. The picture quality is not sharp, colors are dull, not crisp.It looks as if something is missing in the photo, some detail is lost.When I see the properties of the images it shows ISO 64. I also tried taking pics in ISO 200 in program mode, and reducing the EV to -0.3. but still the same problem.

Please can someone suggest some solution to this. I am totally disappointed after buying this cam. I am a beginer or amature and currently a point and shoot person.

A sample photo is here:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3077/...8e75a28e_b.jpg

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/superk550i/3107009718/" title="Building texture by Grey Rocker, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3077/...8e75a28e_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="Building texture" /></a>
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Old Dec 15, 2008, 12:42 PM   #2
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devraj-

I would suggest that you re-examine how you have your camera set-up. The Sample photos indicate that the camera is over exposing yor photos slightly.

I would guess that you are not doing any post processing of your images. For example please take a look at the attached photo. It is one of your photos that I corrected with about 30 seconds of photo editing.

I would suggest that by referring to the camera's documentation that you restore your camera to its factory defaults. And then begin in the auto mode with the ISO set to auto ISO, and no EV corrections applied. When you have made those changes, please take some sample photos so that we can recheck your photos.

To adjust your existing library of photos download Picasa 2 from www.google.com. It is free and very easy to use. Using Picasa2 you can adjust your library of photos and they will look just like the attached photo.

I will be looking forward to providing more assistance after you have adjusted your camera and taken some sample photos. I must add that there may indeed be a defect in the exposure system of your camera as well, that Kodak can repair under warranty.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 15, 2008, 12:48 PM   #3
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If you can, go back to the location of your tall building photo, at the same time of day, with the same weather, and try this....

1. With the camera in its ordinary 'landscape' orientation, and in "P" mode, stand in the same place and point the camera upwards, so that the top half of the screen shows sky, and the bottom half shows the top few floors of the building. The camera now thinks it's looking at a slightly backlit landscape, with a bright sky. It'll usually think along landscape lines, except for certain special 'modes'.

2. Without moving the camera, HALF-press the shutter release button, so that the camera focuses and sets the exposure to what it thinks is right for that scene. (It may be easier if you use your right thumb);

3. Keeping your finger on the button, rotate the camera clockwise in front of your face, and compose the shot to look like the 'bright' original you posted.

4. Press the button down all the way, without releasing it first, to take a shot.

5.Examine the result.

6. If it's still too bright for your taste, turn the EV down and repeat steps 1 to 5. This is a matter of photographic taste.

7. If no success, read the manual sectionabout bracketed exposures, and do some experiments, to do all the above rather quicker.

8. Decide whether the detail in the foregroundis more or less important than a nice tone in the sky, because you're likely to have to choose which you want, quite often.

9. If still dissatisfied, look up posts on 'HDR' (High Dynamic Range) photography, which may achieve your desired result. But it's a lot of work, and the antithesis of 'point & shoot'.

10. Note that you have a supercomputer between your ears, which can very easily out-think any piece of electronic equipment, however smart it thinks it is, especially if it cost just a couple of hundred dollars.Even ones costing thousands of dollars might well have needed some help with this shot.

11. Note also that folk around here will help you develop your skills.

If you'd spent just a little more on a Z712, Z812, Z1012, or Z1015, you'd get an Electronic ViewFinder, in which you could judge the exposure before taking the shot, in P,A,S modes, without the problem of variable ambient lighting on the LCD screen. Or you could do as I did before my EVF, put a black cloth over your head as in Victorian days. But your Z8612 is capable of very good photography, so far as I'm aware.

Good luck!
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Old Dec 15, 2008, 1:24 PM   #4
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Thanks Alan and mtclimber. I have downloaded Picasa 3.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Alan, thanks for explaining in detail the photo taking method.
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Old Dec 15, 2008, 3:05 PM   #5
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devraj_aa wrote:
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...pics bright, dull color...
On both my (May 2007) Z712is and my new Z1012is, I have "High Color" and
"-0.3EV" set by default. I arrived at these settings by trial and error.

"Too bright" (by which I guess you mean "too light") is fixed with less exposure. Later, you can twiddle up underexposure and lack of contrast to some degree in post-processing, but overexposure is impossible to correct. Once large areas of neighbouring pixels are near RGB (255, 255, 255) (white or nearly so), there's nothing you can do about it. 'Expose for the highlights' was the rule for colour slide photography, and it applies to a fair degree in digital photography.

In 'auto' modes on these cameras you can fix this by half-pressing the release when looking upwards a bit towards the sky. This makes the camera think it's brighter, so it turns the exposure down a bit. I have to do this every time I do an in-camera panorama (which is fully automatic).

I often use much less exposure than my routine -0.3EV, and occasionally more; I twiddle the EV compensation (or aperture or shutter) until it looks right in the EVF (after half pressing and releasing the shutter button).

The 'High Color" setting was arrived at by having both eyes open when looking through the viewfinder. You can't do this on the Z8612 (no EVF), but you could stand in a shady or dark place and look at at a bright scene in front of you with one eye, and the LCD with the other. Try this in "High Color" and "Natural Color" settings, and see which is a better match. You can do it either when you've half-pressed and released the shutter button, or better still by previewing a shot you've just taken.

I think Kodak's designers may have had the Z1015's 'Raw' setting (instead of jpg) when they embarked on the design of these cameras. 'Natural Color' on both my cameras is very insipid compared with the real world at the same moment.

As you may have guessed, I spent my working life as a research scientist, doing experiments to find out what gave the best result. These modern cameras are more complex instruments than many of the ones I used every day to measure the real world, so you can expect to have to do a few experiments to get the best out of them, to capture the best picture you can of the beautiful real world out there in front of the lens.

Do the experiments! It costs nothing but your time with digital! You could take the same scene with different settings, and then look at them alongside each other on your computer monitor.

Good luck!
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Old Dec 16, 2008, 2:46 AM   #6
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Thanks Alan, I have made a note of techniques suggested by you, it seems I have to get ready to play with the camera settings a bit.

I have always been a fan of binoculars and cameras. My earlier cam was a mobile cam 2MP!!!!! Sony Ericson K550i. Using this cam i took a lot of photos, and they came just about perfect. My Flickr is filled with these photos.

Iregularly take photos by placingKenko 15x30 monocular in front of themobile cam lense. The photos that come are very good.
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