Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Kodak

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 30, 2009, 4:56 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default Advantages of Z-series

Browsing in other forums near here, I realise that some of my most highly-valued features on my Z712 and Z1012 seem to absent from most of the higher-priced competition. Is this true?

In particular, I am able to perform all normal adjustments without removing the camera from my eye. I'm usually in aperture priority mode, and can twiddle aperture (and hence shutter speed), flash intensity, and ISO using the thumb-wheel. I can switch flash mode, focus mode, and burst/bracketing using the three top buttons behind the shutter release.

If I'm fully conscious, wide awake, and totally sober I can even twiddle between 'Fully auto', P,A,S,M, and 'scene' (only used for panoramas) modes, using the dial on the top. I very seldom need to do that.

This is all without consulting the menu system at all. I can , of course, do that in the EVF as well, if I wish, still without removing the camera from my eye, and review earlier shots.

Is this 'stuck to the eye' facility available on, for example, the FZ-28, and other serious competitors? It's priceless to me. If it isn't, Kodak and we should shout about it a lot louder.

Not having to plough through the menu system is most valuable. If it wasn't for this, I'd never be able to keep up with my family on walks and take photos as well.

If other Kodak fans agree with the above, I'll post a link to this thread in the 'What camera should I buy?' forum.

Last edited by Alan T; Jun 30, 2009 at 5:01 AM.
Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 1, 2009, 10:51 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 75
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan T View Post
In particular, I am able to perform all normal adjustments without removing the camera from my eye. I'm usually in aperture priority mode, and can twiddle aperture (and hence shutter speed), flash intensity, and ISO using the thumb-wheel. I can switch flash mode, focus mode, and burst/bracketing using the three top buttons behind the shutter release.
Hi Alan,

I can do the same on my new/old Fuji S602zoom after I press the menu button on the back of the camera. If I am awake, I can use my thumb to feel my way to the menu button without removing the camera from my eye. In this aspect, the Z1012 is a bit better.

Daniel
dancheng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 13, 2009, 5:32 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Alan-

I agree with you completely. The Kodak Z-1012 offers a lot of bang for the buck and has many more features than you would expect for the selling price.

By the way, Panasonic should introduce a new ultra zoom replacement to the FZ-28 in the next month or so.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 26, 2009, 10:30 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

I toss in one more advantage to the Z*12s. The macro focusing mode works at all focal lengths. This provides great flexability in composition and lighting not found in other super zooms. Not to mention the C cameras by name but it appears that they need a supplemental lens to get anywhere near the flexability we take for granted.

A. C.

Last edited by ac.smith; Sep 25, 2009 at 10:36 AM.
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 26, 2009, 10:41 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Thanks A.C.

All to often I am recommending the Kodak Z-1012 camera to folks on this Forum-

However, sometimes it is a great deal like speaking to a deaf person. People hear the name Kodak, and they somehow tune out. Thus, failing to hear the message about the viability and quality of Kodak cameras. They wander off.

Oh well, I keep trying.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 25, 2009, 6:32 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Italy
Posts: 58
Default

I have to do a present to a friend of mine,few bucks, I would buy a Z1085 could be a good start ?Right?
glaeken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 25, 2009, 10:35 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

I don't own a Z1085 but have seen a fair number of photos taken with that camera. The entire Z*75/85 line of Kodaks are the further developments of the highly regarded C875, a top performer in it's class and day. All of the cameras in this series except one (Z885) use the very capable Schneider-Kreuznach 5x lens. The Z1085 benefits from having a physically large sensor (1/1.667) for this class of camera with a conservative # of megapixels (10MP) which seems to deliver relatively low noise performance at high ISOs. This, coupled with it's optical stabilzation should deliver good performance in low light situations.

My only issue with the camera, and it's a personal one, is that it doesn't have an optical or EVF viewfinder, only an LCD. Truthfully this is consistant with the marketplace and virtually none of its competitors have that facility either.

A. C.

Last edited by ac.smith; Sep 25, 2009 at 10:38 AM.
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:19 AM.