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Old Jul 2, 2009, 3:36 PM   #1
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Default Hi - Z1012 IS questions

First post. I just received my Kodak Z1012 IS and am looking for hints/tips/suggestions on how to get the most out of it. I'd really like to learn to use the PASM settings for good results.

I have been using an Olympus C4040 and a C2020 before it. I really liked these cameras, I think, because of the "super bright" lenses f1.8 they have. I used these cameras almost exclusively in 'P' mode using f1.8 and 1600x1200 resolution.

I got the Z1012 b/c of some comments read here and elsewhere that is good middle step between point/shoot and SLR, and the better zoom.

I'll be traveling to Cabo San Lucas Mexico next week and will be taking pictures of scenery, family and a wedding (my brother's). Just as a guest though, not THE wedding photographer.

Also, I'm torn on which battery setup to get. I see the OEM Kodak setup that seems pretty expensive and then there are ton of generic battery/chargers on eBay. Any suggestions on which batteries to get (or avoid?).

(edit) I just read through the battery sticky. (edit)

Thanks a lot for any input.

Linc

Last edited by Linc; Jul 2, 2009 at 3:42 PM.
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Old Jul 2, 2009, 6:12 PM   #2
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My, possibly eccentric view, is that you should get it to look right in the electronic viewfinder first.

E.g., in 'A' for aperture priority mode, choose a large number (e.g., f/8, small hole) for the aperture if you want near and far to be in focus, and a small number (say f/3.2, large hole) if you want selective focus. If the shutter speed indicated is slower than about 1/60s, (not enough light) consider widening the aperture or turning up the ISO. You can do all this without removing camera from eye.

Half-press the shutter release to get it to focus, and then release, and see if the image looks OK. If it looks washed out and too bright, turn down the EV, or up if it's too dark, using the thumbwheel. Have 'Quickview' turned on in the menu system, take the picture, and if it looks too light or too dark in your few seconds' glimpse in the EV, take another shot with a different EV, until it looks right.

'P' mode as you used before, but on the Z1012, plus any necessary twiddling of the EV would do nicely to start with!

Others may disagree with this procedure, but I find it works well on the Z712 and Z1012.

On batteries, while you're learning, I'd suggest taking AA throwaway Li batteries, plus spares, or one or two throwaway Li CR-V3s. While you're learning, away from home, you don't need the hassle of rechargeables and chargers.

In the longer term I find a pair rechargeable CR-V3 Li-ion batteries, and their matching charger the cheapest (not very) and most satisfactory option. I have a Kodak KLIC-8000 and charger as well, which I acquired by accident as part of my Z1012 package.

Good luck, & I hope you have a wonderful trip! (I had an Olympus C3020Z as my first digicam).

Last edited by Alan T; Jul 2, 2009 at 6:14 PM.
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Old Jul 3, 2009, 1:36 PM   #3
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Default Thanks AlanT

Thanks for the reply AlanT, I somehow missed it yesterday. I will take your advice and do some practicing this weekend.

When you say " take another shot with a different EV, until it looks right" what do you mean?

-Linc
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Old Jul 5, 2009, 4:33 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linc View Post
When you say " take another shot with a different EV, until it looks right" what do you mean?
I mean use the electronic viewfinder in P, A, or S modes before shooting, half-pressing the button to focus and set exposure, to judge whether the image looks correctly exposed. If it doesn't, use the thumbwheel to turn up or down the aperture, shutter or 'exposure value (EV) until it does look right (not too dark, not too light, highlights not white and overblown).

Then take the shot. If you have 'quickview' turned on in the menu system, you'll then get a few seconds' glimpse of the image you've just taken in the viewfinder (or you can look inspect it in review mode). If the exposure looks incorrect, take another shot, after adjusting one of the settings. The easiest one to use is EV (exposure value). Turn it up to get a brighter image, and down to get a darker one. Turning up EV by one unit gives exactly twice as much exposure.

On my Z1012 and Z712, I find the automatic metering often overexposes a little, so I have the EV routinely set to "-0.3EV"., i.e., a little darker than the meter's guess. But that's a matter of individual taste.

The key point is to inspect you images straight away, and take another if it isn't to your taste. This costs nothing but a little time, and helps you to learn, perhaps later, by inspecting the EXIF data embedded in the image, to see what you did right and what went wrong. You can discard the failures later.
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Old Jul 5, 2009, 7:45 AM   #5
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Default Thanks again

Great info, thanks again. I was confused with EV Electronic Viewfinder and EV Exposure Value. This clears it up perfectly.

-Linc
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Old Jul 5, 2009, 10:09 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linc View Post
...I was confused with EV Electronic Viewfinder and EV Exposure Value...
Not at all, my fault! I'd been inadequately precise in my acronyms, and quite possibly I've merrily spread confusion elsewhere as well!

PCMCIA - "People can't memorise computer industry acronyms."
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Old Jul 13, 2009, 5:27 PM   #7
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I always use my Kodak Z-1012 in the P for Program Mode and have had nothing but excellent photos. If I see any over exposure, I just dial in a bit of minus Exposure Compensation, either -0.3 or -0.7, and that takes care of things really nicely.

Enjoy your vacation and your new Z-1012 camera.

Sarah Joyce
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