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Old Oct 7, 2009, 10:47 AM   #1
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Default Kodak M380

I am new to the digital camera world. Like to read what you all write here and have never posted until now.

I need some professional help.

Just bought this camera for my 75th high school reunion in 2 weeks. I have read through instructions 2 or 3 times and am confused.
The event will be inside a banquet hall. Most likely, from what I recall past reunions, the lighting is low. I've never seen a bright light event like this. Dinner tables will be all over, a stage up front, followed by a band and dancing.
I'm assuming I should set the flash to "reduce red-eye" setting? What should I set the other setting at? (portrait, landscape, etc, etc) I want to get the best pictures of my surviving classmates and hope they will turn out nicely. I will not be using a tripod device, just handheld.

Thank you.

Arthur
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 10:49 AM   #2
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Questions?? Please ask and I'll answer as soon as I can.

BTW, I went to Kodak and used their tech help and they were no help at all. I was very disappointed in them.

They just kept telling me to refer to the manual. I told 2 different rep's that I was still confused and they said the manual expalins everything perfectly. I found them to be rude. Just my opinion


Arthur
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 1:18 PM   #3
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Arthur-

You have a very important event coming up quite quickly. So we had better get to work on this problem in a hurry because it will take some experimentation on your part.
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 1:30 PM   #4
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OK, I'm ready. Did you need me to list the settings on top of camera so you can help? Or is looking them up easier for you?


Arthur
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 1:43 PM   #5
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Hi again, Arthur-

Yes, I will need some help. I went to Kodak's website hoping that I could get a look at the Mode Selector, on the top right, as you are looking at the camera from the rear (LCD screen side). But I could not find a photo of the Mode Selector.

So, Step#1:Please tell me the camera settings (not the Scene Modes) available on the M-830's Mode Selector. I am hoping that you will find a "P" indicating "Programed Auto."

Thanks for your help, Arthur. We will do this step by step and it will be easy for you. Right now I have to fix breakfast for my husband. So off I go and I will be back in 30 to 40 minutes.

Thanks for your help, Arthur.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 1:59 PM   #6
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Modes up on top with little turn dial are:
smart capture, program, video, sport, blur reduction, panorma and scene.

Now, when using scene mode, I can choose from portrait, landscape, close up, flower, sunset, backlight, candle light, children, Museum, text, beach, snow, fireworks, self portrait, night portrait, night landscape, and High ISO. Fireworks and museum say I nee a tripod.

the flash button on top has: auto, fill (flash on), red eye, off

Hope I gave the info you requested correctly.

Arthur
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 4:10 PM   #7
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Thanks a lot Arthur-

Ok, we are ready to roll. here is what you are going to do:

(1) Set the Mode Selector (the little turn dial) to P for Programed Auto.

(2) Set the Flash Button to either "Auto" or to "Fill (flash on)."

Note: When the Flash Button is in the "Fill" position, the flash will fire every time you take a photo. That is fine when all you are going to do is to take flash photos. When the "Flash Button" in in the "Auto" position, the camera will try to determine when a flash is actually needed. But that is not allways foolproof. The camera can become confused.

(3) The next issue we have to deal with is "flash range." That is simply how far will the camera's built-in flash unit will cast out the light from the flash with sufficient intensity to get a proper exposure. My guess is that on your M-830 that flash range is most probably about 10 to 12 feet. That means that when you are more than 12 feet from the camera to your subject, the photo will be under exposed and look dark. So as long as you stand no farther than 10 to 12 feet (measured between your camera and your subject) from your subject, you should be just fine and will get a "keeper" photo.

So here is what I want you to do Arthur: Take some experimental photos with the camera using flash, to verify that these instructions will work for you. Remember, if the photo is too dark, the camera is underexposing, and you will have to reduce the distance between the camera and your subject.

I am glad that I could help out. If you have any questions, I will of course be monitoring this this thread and will see your question.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Oct 7, 2009 at 4:13 PM.
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 4:37 PM   #8
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Thank you so very much. I will test tonight when dark outside. Will be easier. Only one question I could think of, the red eye prevention flash, not worth using?

Arthur
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 8:03 PM   #9
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Arthur-

Personally I do not use red eye reduction. My feelings are that the multiple flashes cause confusion among my subjects. After the first flash, my subjects begin to move as the camera actually takes the photo. In some situations, depending on how fast they move, I can end up with a blur in the photo.

So that is the reason why I do not use red eye reduction.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 12, 2009, 2:14 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Arthur-

Personally I do not use red eye reduction. My feelings are that the multiple flashes cause confusion among my subjects. After the first flash, my subjects begin to move as the camera actually takes the photo. In some situations, depending on how fast they move, I can end up with a blur in the photo.

So that is the reason why I do not use red eye reduction.

Sarah Joyce

OK, that setting worked good in all the testing we did this weekend. Took advantage of many scenarios and all went great.
Now, we went outside also, changed the setting to smart capture for outdoor and that wasn't too nice.
It was sunny and very bright, we also were near the beach on some others and it was very bright so I think I messed up woth that setting for those pictures. The indoor ones were perfect. Thanks for that again.
Now, what should have I done for the others that I didn't? Thanks

Arthur
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