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Old May 10, 2010, 6:25 AM   #1
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Default Z1012 has white pixels in pictures

After taking some shots today for Mother's Day, I noticed nearly all of my pictures have a small white dot or pixel in the same location. On some pics it's barley noticeable, but on others it's pretty distracting. It doesn't seem to be dust as I cleaned the lens off and the pixel or dot is perfectly square. I attached a crop of it at 100%. If you zoom in you can see it's a white square surrounded by a black frame. After trying different options it seems it's only on the 10MP setting, or just not that noticeable on lower MP settings. Is the sensor just blanking a small section of the image? Should I expect this problem to get worse and start thinking about a new camera?
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Old May 10, 2010, 6:45 AM   #2
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It's caused by a pixel that's "hot" (too bright). Most cameras will have hot pixels in some conditions (usually with longer exposures and/or higher ISO speeds).

When a pixel is always "hot" (even at normally used shutter speeds), it's referred to as a "stuck pixel" (which sounds like your issue).

Here's a recent thread with links to a couple of software packages you can use to help remove it from photos.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fu...otographs.html

Some cameras have a remap utility designed to get rid of them. Basically, cameras store what's known as a "bad pixel map" in EEPROM. Then, when a photo is taken, it automatically replaces the values in bad pixels with values determined from adjacent pixels. These bad pixels are normally mapped out at the factory. But, in some cases, a camera will develop a problem with a pixel that's not in the bad pixel map. If a camera has a remap utility built in, it can add these to the bad pixel map for you. Basically, it takes a closed shutter (a.k.a., "dark frame") photo and notes the locations of any pixels that are bright to find them.

But, not all cameras have that feature and a trip back to the manufacturer is often needed so they can run proprietary utilities to do the same thing (updating the bad pixel map in EEPROM). I suspect your Kodak falls into that category.

If it's still under warranty and the pixel is hot at typically used shutter speeds, I'd send it back to Kodak. If not (out of warranty), I'd probably use software to get rid of it unless you want to find out what they'd charge you to fix it.
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Old May 10, 2010, 10:29 AM   #3
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That is an excellent explanation, JimC-

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Old May 10, 2010, 5:23 PM   #4
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Thanks for your very detailed reply. Unfortunately, the camera is just days out of warranty. A darn shame as I have taken a total of around 1500 pics so it's not as if I have worn the camera out. The picture I cropped from was 1/30 exposure time and ISO 200. I gave the hotpixel program a shot but it turned the white pixel black, possibly because of the black frame around the hot pixel. I'll try some similar programs and see if they work any better. Do CMOS sensors fair any better than their CCD counterparts in this situation?
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Old May 10, 2010, 5:31 PM   #5
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It's tough to say if one sensor type works better than another, since camera manufacturers have already mapped out bad pixels before they ship a camera (so, unless you have access to proprietary service software, there's no easy way to tell how many bad pixels a given sensor has), and I doubt trying to put together statistics from forum posts about a given camera model's tendency to develop more bad pixels would get you very far (since it's not a problem that pops up often enough to allow you to jump to any conclusions).

I suspect that there is very little (if any) difference in that area between sensor types (CMOS versus CCD), given a similar sensor size, resolution and manufacturer date. But, that's just speculation without access to proprietary service history information from manufacturers.
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Old May 10, 2010, 5:47 PM   #6
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If the camera in under warranty still, send it back to the manufacturer to have the the issue resolved.
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