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Old Apr 26, 2012, 10:17 PM   #1
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Default What camera are these from?

I have four rolls of video tape from 1961. The plastic cases say they were made in Germany and they are of the Kodak brand. Can anyone tell me what camera that they are from, if possible, and also how to go about finding out what is on them?
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Old Apr 26, 2012, 11:45 PM   #2
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These appear to be 8mm movie film. There were basically two types made in B&W and color, and those are "standard 8mm" and "super 8mm". There are still people around that can, for a reasonable price, copy them to DVD.

The difference between standard and super8 is the spacing of the sprocket holes in the film. In 1961, I would suspect the film to be standard 8.
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Old Apr 26, 2012, 11:47 PM   #3
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There are still projectors around that will play those films, although with each passing year, they are getting more scarce.
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Old May 22, 2012, 8:52 PM   #4
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My father used to love to take home movies (early '60s). He'd get the film back on reels that looked exactly like the top two gray reels in your photo. He used a Kodak camera just like this one http://www.etsy.com/listing/23787703...cat3_gallery_3

We'd sit around some evenings, put up the screen and turn out the lights and watch the films listening to the whirring of the projector (no sound track in those days). A DVD transfer wouldn't be the same without the projector whirring included.

It's been a long time since I thought about those movies. I might still have some of the films, but I'm sure the projector is gone.

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Old May 23, 2012, 9:55 AM   #5
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When I was a child back in the 60s my Grandfather had a Super 8 camera and projector. He shot many rolls of film of my brothers and me. Years ago we had them transferred to VHS and recently I transferred them to DVD. It's a good thing we had several copies among the family since all but one copy was lost to hurricane Katrina. One of the best movies he shot was the moon landing. He set up his camera to film the television when the landing was broadcast live. He was the inventor of the DVR!
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Old May 23, 2012, 10:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BackBayBiloxi View Post
...He set up his camera to film the television when the landing was broadcast live. He was the inventor of the DVR!
That reminds me of a suggestion by the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America) for fair use of video clips in school environments for teaching purposes.

Thanks in no small part to the lobbying efforts of the Motion Picture Industry, we have the DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) that makes it illegal to rip DVDs, because they're encrypted and you would be circumventing that encryption to make a copy of them. Of course, you'll find lots of software around to do that kind of thing, because developers figured out how to break the CSS encryption method a long time ago. But, it's still illegal to circumvent the encryption used on a DVD to make a copy of it under the DMCA (even though I never see it enforced as long as you're doing it for personal use).

So, the MPAA put out a video on how to copy a DVD a while back using your Grandfather's method that made the news on a lot of different sites, just showing how absurd the law can be (where you'd have to use a low quality method of copying the content for fair use in education environments so that you wouldn't be circumventing the encryption).

Here's one article about it:

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2...-not-rip-dvds/

Basically, even though Copyright Law has some exemptions for fair use of Copyrighted Content for educational purposes, the DMCA still makes it illegal to circumvent encryption algorithms if you want to make a copy of that content.
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