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Old Feb 7, 2005, 12:01 AM   #11
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I think for the handheld rule in relation to appeture and ISO setting is that increasing either one stop, will allow you to shoot one stop faster, since it is my understanding that all stops, appeture, shutter, and ISO, are relative.

So if the handheld rule says you can use 1/250 shutter, if you go from iso 100 to 200 you could shoot at one stop faster shutter and get the same exposure as if you were at 1/250 at ISO 100. I would imagine the same would be true for aperture.

Can anyone more knowlegable them me confirm, that?
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Old Feb 7, 2005, 8:40 PM   #12
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Well, I finally purchased the camera. I took a lot of test shots (all indoor in my placeas it has been raining out here). Iwantto say I'm 100% satisfied with the purchase but unfortunately that is not the case. I still have few reserves about this camera; good thing is I have 14 days to return it. Few things I noticed, and any advice that can be offered, of course, would be grateful. To Brian, you are absolutely correct that there isn't much of a difference between a 8X zoomand a10X zoom - I did find few blurry shots but most of it is probably due to my inexperience in using the camera.

The most prevalent "problems" I encountered shooting in my living room was that even with a well light halogen floor lamp in my room, the camera won't focus unless theflip-upflashis utilized (I keep getting a lot of red warning signals popping up in the lcd screen). Stupid question, is this normal? I mean, isn't the halogen light enough for the camera to shoot without worrying about blur results? Anyhow, everytime I'm forced to use the flip-up flash mode, the background looks bluish, very unnatural looking.At times, the camera struggles to focus (I can hear loud noises emanating from the zoom motor). In another test, I attempted to take some shots (using the flip-up flash,of course)in total darkness with only the t.v. on. The result? Some blurry shots; when I raised the ISO to 400, the pics came out pretty okay. Picture quality wise, I got to admit I'm very satisfied with the results (shots that came out clear and crisp). I really don't understand why other reviewers, especially professional ones, don't give it a very high mark; heck, one professional reviewer gave the picture quality of this camera 3 out of 5 stars. Oh well, to each his own.

Like I said, I'm a novice digital camera user. I definitely don't want to have to return this camera because of the issues I raised. I feel this is stilla great camera (size is perfect for me, not too heavy, user friendly, great looking). I just need some pointers on how to take great, general pictures. With that said, which mode and settings (shutter and aperture)is best for taking shots of the following conditions:

Beach/sunny outdoor shots - cars, buildings, people, nature (Steve's test for outdoor shots shows ISO setting at 80, should I always use this setting?) For people, should I always use macro mode?

Night shots - downtown, the moon. Which settings is best for these kind of shots?

Action sports - what would be considered a reasonable mode for taking shots of a football and baseball game? Is it essential that I have a tripod to prevent blurry shots, especially if I use the burst mode?

On toanother point. In one of Steve's reviews of this camera, he pointed out that the zoom lens is fast. I'm not sure if I agree with his assertion because the lens when I zoom out and zoom in, it doesn't glide smoothly (unlike the Canon S1 IS, which I tested out at the score).

p.s. I called Kodak tech support today and mentioned about the image stabilizer issue. The tech guy told me that this issue has been "escalated" and that Kodak is seriously looking into it. Man, I just hope that if I decide to keep my camera Kodakwon't release a similar model WITH an image stabilizer in the next few months, considering I spent $433 for this camera.


Oh, I forgot to ask, is sandisk extreme sd card highly recommended? I bought the 256mb cardbut it was bit pricey ($60) so I'm thinking about returning it. Kodak states it doesn't matter how fast, what brand you use, well, the recommend using their own brand, naturally. How about sd card reader? Since the camera comes with a camera dock, I guess I won't need a card read, right?


Thanks everyone. I hope I didn't bore any of you.

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Old Feb 8, 2005, 12:16 AM   #13
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Hey there,

While I am still learning and experimenting with various settings myself I will leave that for sombody to answer. As for your low light level focusing issue, Kodak just released a firmware update for that last month, you can get it on their website. It really made a difference on my 7590, should work much better for you.



Also not sure about your SD card being recommended, but it does sound a bit pricey. I have an old 256Mb Sandisk card and it works fine, but I got a new 60x 1 Gig card, and it was only $140 Canadian, so $60 for a 256 sounds steep to me. Have fun with the new toy

Vesper
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 8:44 AM   #14
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Quote:
Beach/sunny outdoor shots - cars, buildings, people, nature (Steve's test for outdoor shots shows ISO setting at 80, should I always use this setting?) For people, should I always use macro mode?
You can stick the the pre-defined modes to start out with...ISO 80 or 100 should be fine for the daytime outdoor shots. I wouldn't use macro mode for people (unless really close!) - use the portrait mode.


Quote:
Night shots - downtown, the moon. Which settings is best for these kind of shots?
Night shots and moon shots are different. For night shots, once again, try using the night preset scene mode...but be aware that the shutter speeds will be quite slow, so you'll wantto try to hold the camera a steady as possible. For moon shots, you'll likely want to use landscape mode, set the camera for spot metering and set the shutter for 1/250 or faster...

Quote:
Action sports - what would be considered a reasonable mode for taking shots of a football and baseball game? Is it essential that I have a tripod to prevent blurry shots, especially if I use the burst mode?
I don't imagine that you'd need a tripod for these events, since you'll be using a fast shutter speed...I think many people have had good success using the Sports mode for these types of shots.

Quote:
Oh, I forgot to ask, is sandisk extreme sd card highly recommended? I bought the 256mb cardbut it was bit pricey ($60) so I'm thinking about returning it. Kodak states it doesn't matter how fast, what brand you use, well, the recommend using their own brand, naturally. How about sd card reader? Since the camera comes with a camera dock, I guess I won't need a card read, right?
I don't think you'd get much benefit froma high-speed SD card with the 7590...


Definitely get the firmware upgrade, as Vesper mentioned...

Good luck with the 7590 and post some photos soon!

Mark

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Old Feb 8, 2005, 11:46 AM   #15
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Right on. Yeah, I updated the firmware yesterday, version 1.01. I tested some shots out and again,with the halogen floor lamp lit, and when the flip-up flashwas enabled, I at times still got a darker, yet still clear and sharp pics,but still got a result showing a blue-like background, especially off the white wall. This is frustrating, to say the least. I have yet to test the camera in outdoor setting, which I hope to do real soon and will post few sample pics when I get a chance. As far as what brandof secure digital card I should buy, I guess it doesn't really matter. Then again, I read on the Kodak website that the DX model has some conflicting issue with sandisk. I guess I will have to do a little more research on this.

Mark, should I use the "P" mode for darker, indoor shots (as Brian recommended)? With regard to general outdoor photos (i.e. beach, zoo), should I set my ISO at 80-100 most of the time, right? How about the aperture mode and shutter speeds? I should mostly rely on either the Auto and P modes for outdoor shots, right?

Thanks again, guys! Please keep on posting when you get a chance!


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Old Feb 8, 2005, 12:29 PM   #16
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Quote:
Mark, should I use the "P" mode for darker, indoor shots (as Brian recommended)? With regard to general outdoor photos (i.e. beach, zoo), should I set my ISO at 80-100 most of the time, right? How about the aperture mode and shutter speeds? I should mostly rely on either the Auto and P modes for outdoor shots, right?
Yes, the 'P' mode is good for that sort of thing...I've heard it described as auto-mode on steriods! It lets the camera decide most things ( shutter speed, aperture, etc) but letsyou use the menu options to set some manual things, like white-balance and ISO. Probably the first thing to try to correct for darker, indoor shots is to use the jog-dial to increase the exposure compensation. You can change that in the auto modes as well.

I seldom use anything other than the auto-modes when taking shots outdoors - but sometimes exposure compensation needs to be set. The camera usually set the ISO to 100 for me. However,I have found that taking shots on sunny days with lots of snowin the scene required 'P' mode, so that the white-balance could be manually set to daylight.

I'm still a newbie at this digital photography stuff and I defer to Brians suggestions in case I contradicted anything he said!

Mark
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 1:35 PM   #17
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mblue1 wrote:
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On to another point. In one of Steve's reviews of this camera, he pointed out that the zoom lens is fast. I'm not sure if I agree with his assertion because the lens when I zoom out and zoom in, it doesn't glide smoothly (unlike the Canon S1 IS, which I tested out at the score).
The zoom control is touch-sensitive. You can zoom quickly (and smoothly) or you can zoom at a slower pace. I have found the zoom to be very smooth. I disabled the digital zoom, as it is pretty much useless for most situations. Not sure how smooth you need your zoom to be, but I find it on par with the Canon.

I too was debating between the Canon S1 IS and the DX7590. In the end, I chose the Kodak because I found the options to be much better and more user-friendly. I also wanted more megapixels, and I also find Kodak's colour technology is better. The Canon is still a great camera, but for my money I prefer to have something at least sort of current.
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 4:43 PM   #18
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Yes you do need to open the flash indoors BUT you don't have to use it if you think you have enough light already. Maybe try turning the flash off and see if you still have the "blue tinge"...as for macro mode for people shots,I wouldnt think so,its best used for closeups.

Dan
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 4:48 PM   #19
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Forgot to mention...I've been using my 7590 since sept. with sandisk sd cards( a 256 and a 512) and have had no problems with them. I think the high speed(ultra or whatever they call it)would be a waste of money.

Dan


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Old Feb 8, 2005, 6:09 PM   #20
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I think,,,could be wrong though,,,that Steeve was referring to the lense being fast in that it has an aperature of f2.8-3.7....letting in more light than some lesser lenses makes it faster in that sense....

As for SD cards,,,Lexar and other brands have high speed SD cards cheaper than Sandisk,,,they are really not a lot of help in the 6490/7590 as the camera writes too slow to make use of them,,,me and Paul have done so not so scientific tests and really could see little if no difference with the faster cards in the 6490,,but in a card reader you would notic the difference i would think...

Is the camera giving you a AF warning in the haogen lit room,,,or is it a AE warning,,,,if it`s an AE warning is there an icon next to it with a set of hands showing,,if so the pic can be taken,,,,but the camera is telling you that the shutter speed is going to be low,,,and may come out blurry if you do not brace yourself or use a tripod..

Auto mode is not good in low light like the halogen light room,,,,,the camera will only go to ISO 140 in auto mode,,,and the programing in the camera wants to see the flash on,,,,

To get decent indoor pics in that room,,go to "P" mode,,set the ISO to 200-400 to get the shutter speed up,,,then turn on the flash to auto...with the subject no more than 10 feet away,,if further than that you`ll need an external flash..

As for the blue cast in the wall,,,,well go into menu,,check your white balance,,,auto should work,,but if not the set it to daylight,,,,,the flash has the same temperature light as daylight,,and it should make white walls white,,,does on the 6490 anyway...



Brian


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