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Old Jul 11, 2005, 11:15 PM   #1
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this one is ok - Pablo

WAS ABLE BECAUSE OF THE HELPFUL COMMENTS BELOW TO GET A BETTER MOON SHOT will post it below -- Thanks to all of you, Pablo



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Old Jul 11, 2005, 11:17 PM   #2
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One end is bad. - Pablo
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Old Jul 11, 2005, 11:18 PM   #3
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Both ends are bad. What did I do wrong? - Pablo
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Old Jul 11, 2005, 11:28 PM   #4
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Hey Pablo, just seems to me as if its too long an exposure and a lil motion blur...perhaps some wind or some other vibration cuz yer really zoomed in on it...cuz with that much zoom the cam becomes alot more sensitive IMO:-)
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Old Jul 11, 2005, 11:39 PM   #5
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Looks like motion blur to me too Pablo. Were you using a tripod and if you were were you using digi zoom as well?


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Old Jul 12, 2005, 12:01 AM   #6
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Could be motion blur. I use the self timer to avoid any shakes. Try less exposure time. It does appear to be a tad overexposed. I have also found that the autofocus can struggle at times on the moon. I have had press the button on half way down and release many times until the AFturns green.

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Old Jul 12, 2005, 8:27 AM   #7
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Thanks for the help, I did use tripod and digi zoom on some of them and I'll tryshooting it tonight with self timer, no digi, tripod and less exposure.

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Old Jul 12, 2005, 8:43 AM   #8
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Questions rather than answers...

If this is motion blur, why isn't the right side of the moon blurred as well as the tips?

Could this be something caused by the "black mask" algorithm that Kodak uses for long night exposures?

I haven't seen much discussion of the latter, which is in my DX7630's specs as "Full manual exposure (Noise reduction: subtraction of black image [when greater than] 0.7 sec.)"

This is sometimes called "dark current noise subtraction" - the all black sections of pictures taken at nightare simply subtracted, removing the noise that would otherwise be there due to electrical activity in the CCD.

Possibly the Kodak algorithm goes a bit too far in deciding what's supposed to be subtracted, and there go the ends of your moon... maybe?

(Later: a possible experiment occurs -- take one pic at a speed shorter than that whenyour camera's subtraction of black image kicks in -- in my case, it'dbe maybe 0.5 sec.-- you'll have to look through your camera's specifications to see when it kicks in.

Then take another at the expsure times used in your original photos. There may not be much on the first pic, as it's likely to be underexposed- but you should be able to see if the moon... ahem...er... stays horny, so to speak...)



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Old Jul 12, 2005, 9:13 AM   #9
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This has all been covered by people here, but I just thought I'd add my bit. The moon is a lot brighter than you think... a lot brighter. Depending on atmospheric conditons,you canhave exposures ranging from 1/90, to 1/750. The latter is very moody, but all the detail is intact. Anything slower than90 and you run the risk of burning out detail, especially near the tycho crater in the southern hemisphere. Now, a partial moon has less light, so your exposures would be adjusted accordingly.

Once you have worked the bugs out you can have a lot of fun doing moon shots... you can start doing silhouettes and other things. One problem is that because it is dark, and the moon is bright, you can't expose for details in earthbound objects unless you do a blended exposure, which is to take two shots of the same scene, one exposed for the highs and one for the lows, and then to join the two in your editing software.

Cheers,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
http://tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com


Oops... browsing through my library, I found a full moon at 1/1000 sec. Creepy!:O
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Old Jul 12, 2005, 11:05 AM   #10
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I have found that when shooting the moon
an EV of -2 seems to produce the best shots
with my DX6490 I can only goto f/8 so what ever shutter speed
gives you an EV -2
try it what do ya have to lose

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