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Old Jan 10, 2006, 9:56 PM   #1
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Hi there i just got a kodak easyshare v550, iam a newbie at photo taken.

I am please with the outdoors pictures taken at the auto setting, but i noticed that when i take an indoor picture (night club or restaurant) they come really dark.

i did some reading on this forum and realized that i have to play with the ISO settings to improve the indoor pictures, so i would like some help about this:

1. what is the ideal ISO setting for taking pictures at night clubs/restaurants with this camera?

2. When using ISO, do i have to have the flash on or off?

3. should i leave it at* AUTO ? Because there a setting called PARTY supposibly to take pictures in a low light situation but i tried it and did not see much diference.

I know these maybe be very simple questions but i just learning to take pictures.

thanks in advance.
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Old Jan 11, 2006, 4:57 AM   #2
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Hi Aztec,

I don't know much about your camera so I cannot give you a do this and do that answer. What I can offer though is to do what most of us do and that is just shoot shoot and then shoot some more. You have to learn your camera through experience. Very few inexperienced photographers can pull a cam right out of the box and get great photos. The more you shoot the more you learn. Don't forget you can delete and delete.
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Old Jan 11, 2006, 8:43 AM   #3
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Try ISO 400 and the Party mode! What the party mode will do is allow you to take photos in low light but also get some that have some motion in them! Play with the ISO as the lower the ISO number the less noise will be in the photo. ISO 400 is a starting point but you may have to go higher if the camera will allow it in some situations or conversly you may be able to go lower if there is sufficiant light! But like Jim said don't be afraid to experiment. And practice practice practice!

Dawg
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Old Jan 11, 2006, 1:35 PM   #4
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Thank you very much for your input guys, i will try the settings bigdawg suggested.
And for sure will practice alot with different settings.
thanks
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Old Jan 11, 2006, 6:45 PM   #5
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You're always welcome!
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Old Jan 13, 2006, 3:39 PM   #6
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Greetings Aztec,

Glad to help if I can.

ISO stands for International Standards Organization. As it is with film, the ISO setting relates to the sensitivity of the sensor to light. Film might have an ISO value of 400 as opposed to 200. This would relate to the silver halides in the film while with a digital sensor it relates to other factors, i.e. how the pixels will calculate available light. The feature is used in conjunction with aperture and shutter settings to help you get your best results.

Your camera has a number of features that you can use to maximize your results, but you can only go so far before your image begins to degrade. Also, as you increase the ISO, the 'noise' in your image will increase. You can liken noise to grain in film. What you want to do is get as close to your subjects as possible so you can get them in your flash range. For your camera the options are:





Aperture


f/2.8 at wide, f/4.8 at tele

Shutter speed


8–1/1448 sec

Flash offers at wide—2–10.5 ft (0.6–3.2 m) and tele—2–7.2 ft (0.6–2.2 m)

These settings mean that you do not have much distance to capture in the flash range Best you can expect will be about 10 feet or so. So, I would consider using the features the camera offers such as exposure compensation of ±2.0 EV with 0.3 EV step increments. You can also increase the ISO up to 800. You can test this by trying some pictures in reduced lighting before you go to some event.

Once you reach the max settings there is nothing else you can do but try to improve later in software. One other possible but slight improvement would be to use the spot meter setting, so the camera will try to get the best exposure of the subject of greatest interest.

Of couse in these low light situations, I would try setting the camera down and use it on a stable support, ie.small tripod if you have one.

This dilemma would be the same for most any camera.

If you think I can help you further, let me know.

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company
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Old Jan 14, 2006, 7:04 AM   #7
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Ron-

What do you think about adding a slave flash. I have had a lot of success with using a slave to add much needed light to a photo at times?

MT
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