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Old Feb 10, 2006, 7:49 AM   #1
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Took a few sunrise photos this morning. I am wondering is there a best setting for these. I want to be able to still capture the sunrays. I am (for the most part) satisfied with them, but would like to make them better.

Thanks for your help-

Tracy


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Old Feb 10, 2006, 7:50 AM   #2
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Old Feb 10, 2006, 7:51 AM   #3
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Old Feb 10, 2006, 11:50 AM   #4
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Very nice shots Tracy. I think No. one you came pretty close! I'll be watching myself as I've never really tried to catch the sunbeams. I've done it often with the 35mm in years past but never tried to do it. Always caught them by luck I guess!

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Old Feb 10, 2006, 12:22 PM   #5
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Critique

the shots are very good.

In order to get the sunrays you need to expose for the suns rays. f you could set the camera on Spot metering or if your camera allows for exposure bracketing try it. or see if you can read the exposure of the sun by shooting in max telephoto then set that exposure manually. or just underexpose by a couple of stops -2ev.

The bottom line is practice and take notes. but, full auto is not (normally) the way to go. but, alas, sometimes, we get lucky.

the more you shoot, the better you get. Most of us could not afford to do that back in the film only days, but now, its only some space on a card.


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Old Feb 10, 2006, 7:23 PM   #6
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Thank you Oh Grey one for the help. And yes I remember those 35mm days even now as I still have my trusty old Pentax K1000 and use it every now and then just punish myself with the processing costs!!! LOL

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Old Feb 11, 2006, 3:35 PM   #7
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WhenI want to get a good photograph of a rainbow, or to show steam coming out of a tea kettle I use minus exposure compensation. I would think that showing shafts of sunlight would work the same way.

This is an old, old photo taken at the Carnival Celebration in Rio de Janeiro. I wanted to make these spot lights show up in the photo, so I used minus exposure compensation again, and it worked.

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Old Feb 11, 2006, 3:42 PM   #8
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Light waves are light waves no matter the source. You would need dust or steam or humidity to make tem appear as shafts of light and your way seems to work well MT.

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