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Old Feb 22, 2006, 1:30 PM   #1
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Hello,

I am looking for opinions on the durability of the V530. I am replacing an old Canon G1 and will be buying an ultracompact. I have performed my own photo comparision with the V530, Panasonic FX9 and a Canon SD400. I really like that I can buy the Kodak for $200, and the color composition of the photos is excellent. The FX9 and SD450 (if I buy a Canon it would be the 450) both cost close to $300 and take decent photos. I really like the IS of the Panasonic and it works great (but indoor people pictures with flash are not very good from the Panasonic). I like the Canon except for the price and no IS. I am thinking of buying the Kodak and replacing it in 2 years with something else that is small, with better zoom, and IS. I am concrened about the buttons on the Kodak (definitely lower quality than the Canon and Panasonic). Do you use the menus frequently and have they given you any trouble? It seems like the center button is difficult to use without hitting the other toggles. Any input would be appreciated.

Thanks
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Old Feb 22, 2006, 1:47 PM   #2
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I have a v550, the difference with the v530 is the buttons position, viewfinder and bigger LCD. The metal body is excellent. I carry mine in a bag pack all the time (still a student xD).
I wouldn't recommend the Canon SD Series. All of them seem to have a LCD problem (check in the Canon subforum, the "sd300 cracked lcd" theme to read what am I talking about, it applies to the SD450 too).
In a "pocket size" cameras comparison, the Lumix series won over the V series because of the OIS, but the overall quality of the V series was better (the V550 went second place of the comparison).
About the buttons, the "OK" button (center one) is a little troublesome, but you get used to it (at least I got used xD).

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Old Feb 22, 2006, 1:57 PM   #3
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My thought was that the new design larger screen on the SD450 should have eliminated the LCD problem. Some co-workers have the SD400 and have not had a problem. I am still concerned because I want to take the camera with while downhill skiing. Is the optical viewfinder necessary? How is the LCD in the sun?

Thanks again
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Old Feb 22, 2006, 2:12 PM   #4
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There are differing opinions about the optical viewfinder. Some people do OK with just the LCD. I personally find it hard to quickly acquire and follow targets in dynamic situations with the LCD when zoomed out. And the best of them are marginal in bright sunlight and others are downright impossible. But I live in Florida where the sun is almost always shining. Might be different for someone living in London or Seattle.

If you have no use for manual controls I think the V530 isn't a bad place to start if you plan upgrading in a couple of years. Friends bought a V550 on my recommendation and are quite happy with it.

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Old Feb 22, 2006, 2:16 PM   #5
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The viewfinder comes handy if you want to save some battery (if you'll use the camera a lot, think about a spare battery) or use long time exposure.About the LCD, I'll quote Steve's conclusion:"The V550's 2.5-inch LCD display was a pleasure to use, brilliant enough to be usable outdoors even in bright sunlight and providing enough "gain-up" to be usable in dim lighting. In review mode, the LCD's wide angle of view was very effective when sharing your shots with friends. When using exposure compensation, the LCD viewfinder previews the result, darkening or brightening the live image in response to the degree of under/over exposure you've set. A small optical viewfinder is also provided, useful in extreme lighting conditions or to save battery power."
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Old Feb 22, 2006, 3:00 PM   #6
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I am a lot like slipe, in that I like to have an optical viewfinder. I you have a moving subject, the viewfinder, at least for me, makes life a whole lot more pleasant. If you areconcerned about the reduced flash range of the V-530 or the V-550, than can be addressed rather easily with an inexpensive slave flash, such as the one shown in the attached photo.

MT
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Old Feb 22, 2006, 3:27 PM   #7
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MT, How is that flash triggered? My G1 had a flash shoe but I haven't seen any small cameras that have one. I would be inclined to buy the V530 since the only real difference is that LCD and viewfinder. The FX8 can be purchased for ~$230 (also smaller viewfinder than FX9) so that would still be in a similar price range. I wish the Kodak have better buttons and a better menu system. I really like the Canon menu system that doesn't disable the screen for framing the shot. Is the menu shared between the V530 and V550?

Thanks
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Old Feb 22, 2006, 7:41 PM   #8
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JM-

A Slave Flash is quite simple. It is triggered by the host camera's built-in flash unit. Due to the fact that the Slave Flash has a photocell to "see" the host camera's flash, there is no need for a wired connection and the Slave Flash due to the speed of light is fully synchronized with the host camera. A Slave Flash will work with any host camera that has a built-in flash.

MT
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Old Mar 2, 2006, 12:16 AM   #9
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my v530 will be here tomorrow...I like theidea of using a slave flash with it.

wonderif I could get aflash adapter module (that works with an existing flash) and use my existing Kodak p-20 flash, connected to the v530.

hmmmm.....just a thought

I found this page interesting..
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...hp/t-1887.html

Ive never seen that optex adapterused with an existing flash
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Old Mar 2, 2006, 12:59 AM   #10
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MT Do you have overexposure problems with the slave?
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