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Old Apr 1, 2003, 1:19 AM   #1
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Default DC4800 Flash problem in low light rooms

Hi all

We bought a DC4800 about a year ago. and I have a problem with flash photography in rooms that have low light levels. The camera seems to read this light and cut down the amount of flash and my photo's are mostly too dark and unuasable. It will take a better photo if I turn OFF the flash in an indoor museum or indoor car show with very low room light. I've taken photo's at a indoor Christmas party with some florescent light and if I use any zoom other than wide angle with flash, again the shot is way too dark.
I can sometimes aim the camera at a fixed spot indoors with the flash on and shoot three shots and get three different amounts of light. Usually the first ones are dark and the last one will be ok.
I can see that some flash's are very weak while the next shot will light up the whole room and I've not changed a thing. ?????HELP
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 8:26 PM   #2
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I have a DX4330 and noticed that the flash is often too tiny to illuminate large rooms with low light. The pictures come out dark, as you said, and turning on the flash will get better results. However, blurry images are common under this circumstances and a tripod would be needed. At times, non-white light can also cause trouble with the white balance of the camera.
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Old Sep 23, 2003, 7:05 PM   #3
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Default Re: DC4800 Flash problem in low light rooms

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chromedome
I've taken photo's at a indoor Christmas party with some florescent light and if I use any zoom other than wide angle with flash, again the shot is way too dark.
I routinely put +1 stop (or more) on for all flash with my DC4800, which usually sorts it out. A very common error by amateurs is to ignore the maximum distance that the flash is useful for - no more than 3 metres (10 feet) for most on-camera flashes. I've seen any number of people using their flash in big rooms. Totally useless.
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Old Oct 21, 2003, 2:57 PM   #4
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Default Igp is right

Point and shoot cameras are generally vey limited in their range.
The are pretty much designed for "snapshots" in small rooms -

Try his suggestion and see what happens - you should see improvement -
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