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Old Mar 26, 2006, 3:26 PM   #21
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thanks for the tips, I knew I could go to sleep at night posting that and wake up with some answers.

It seems to be image stabilization can only take you so far.

Being a distant subject with TCON, using a tripod came to mind, as Ive done with moon shots, but I just didnt think to grab it with all the action going down.I did attempt to stabilize against a light pole. That obviously didnt help much.

Should the shutter speed be changedin Shutter Priority mode?
Will changing it causethe pics to be darker?

Even with the cloudylighting andauto ISO in Program mode, they ended up being ISO100 -> confusing ????. And in auto mode the flash popped up, so the camera must have found it needed.

This was a good "experiment". I think I have a lot moreto learn.
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Old Mar 26, 2006, 7:27 PM   #22
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The TCON can slightly darken a photo over a non TCON camera. Also a UV filter can do the same as well as a polorizing lens. When I use a post I put the largest part of the TCON in contact with the post and not just my shoulder. By doing this I've gotten very steady shots even when going full Digi-zoom. I know it will scratch my lens a little and over time make it look like a reject at a Flea Market but I don't normally sell mine or care what it looks like as long as it gets the job done! Your flash was trying to tell you that the area you were going to photograph was too dark for the settings and needed more light. The distance at which you were shooting precluded the flash being of any benefit!
When the camera decided it needed the flash it also decided ISO 100 would be alright. But it didn't put the light loss from the TCON and any filter into the mix when it was making thisa decision. If you had selected an ISO of 200 or 400 and adjusted the shutter to a faster speed the motion blur would not have been as apparent! Going to a faster shutter speed is going to make the photo darker as light is not allowed to stay on the sensor as long so the accumalation of light is not enough to get a properly exposed photo! Also remember that by zooming out you also closed the arperture to F3.7 or so. This also is a reason for slowing down the shutter speed to gain a longer duration of light exposure to make up for the loss in area of exposure caused by the smaller arperture. Hope some of this made some sense.

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Old Mar 27, 2006, 3:04 PM   #23
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i'm still absorbing it all. Thanks for takin the time to help educate me.

seems it can be concluded it was not a "fault" of the camera, and using a dlsr would not have made much difference, right? I still would need a tripod and some sunlight.

Ireally wish blur wasnt such an issue in high zoom still cams.
My old JVC VHS-C camcorder has 600x zoom and i dont get blurry video,
even without a tripod!

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Old Mar 28, 2006, 9:37 AM   #24
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With a still cam you're trying to stop any movement. With a cam corder you capturing the movement as movement so any movement on your part is not as apt to show up!

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