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Old Apr 24, 2006, 12:43 PM   #1
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Is there a reason I would not use the maximum sharpness setting on my cameras?:?



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Old Apr 24, 2006, 4:10 PM   #2
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The strangest thing about it.... why is the second level the default setting?
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Old Apr 24, 2006, 6:34 PM   #3
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Too salty, too sweet, too hot. Yes

Too sharp?:?Duh!



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Old Apr 24, 2006, 7:53 PM   #4
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Too much sharpening can degrade image quality.

Sharpening usually works by increasing contrast at edges. It's an optical illusion. If you have too much sharpening, it can lead to artifacts like halos around edges and an overprocessed look to images.

So, rather than let the camera apply it in a split second, some users prefer to do it using software later, where they have more control over the amount applied, depending on the use for the image.

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Old Apr 24, 2006, 8:30 PM   #5
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Jim C

Thanks!

If maximum sharpness is used and the results are excessive would this be corrected with the softening/feathering feature in Adobe Elements $ ( and other programs)?



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Old Apr 25, 2006, 9:51 AM   #6
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FeRio the second setting is the one that works best for most photos therefore it is the one set as a default. I like to use the sharp setting in soft light like a heavy overcast day or when it is misty or doing a slow rain. The lower light takes away some of the contrast and the sharpest setting seems for me anyway to put it back on. Another time it seems to work best is on long distance shots through smog or haze!

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Old Apr 25, 2006, 5:18 PM   #7
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I always shoot with the sharpest setting:-)
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Old Apr 25, 2006, 5:31 PM   #8
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Boily wrote:
Quote:
I always shoot with the sharpest setting:-)
I tend to prefer minimal in-camera sharpening, as I sharpen each image according to its particularproperties. If I could, I would turn thesharpening off entirely. I find the defalult level of sharpening sometimes too much, particularly in high-detail/high-contrast situations. Seeing as my camera doesn't have a RAW mode, I prefer to have as pure a jpeg as possible. I know that conventional wisdom is that all digital images need sharpening, but I don't mind doing the work myself.

My two cents.

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Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
http://tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com
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