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View Poll Results: Were you a photographer before digital cameras were widely available?
Yes 11 61.11%
No 7 38.89%
Voters: 18. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Jul 25, 2006, 12:24 PM   #11
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My first camera was an old Imperial 620 box camera. I got it from my dad. We shot black and white, developed them in a little plastic drum and then made contact prints. That's why we used the 620 format, because we didn't have an enlarger. I still have a bunch of the prints and negatives. The other thing I liked about that simple camera was the ability to double expose a negative by just not winding the film forward. I was able to make some very basic "trick" photos, like my brother standing next to himself and keyhole frames. That was 30 years ago. Didn't get back "into it" until 5 or so years ago with digital.
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 12:55 PM   #12
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Ken, I haven't used one personally, but my company uses '3D virtual tours' a lot. Our head photographer shoots all the high end properties and also does the Virtual Tours using a system called iPix. He shoots the property room by room, then runs the image files through some software to generate the Virtual Tour. Here's a sample:

http://media.homestore.com/idx/HTS74349.htm
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 7:16 PM   #13
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Well my vote was yes. When I was a kid I got an old Kodak Brownie, which was followed up by an Instamatic, and a couple of Polaroids. I really started getting serious at about 17 yrs, when I bought a Yashica GSN. I started paying attention to how I took photos, and experimenting to get different effects, with settings.

In law enforcement I had to photograph crime scenes, and evidence. The first camera I used was the Pressman Greyflex camera. They used only B & W film, and the big flash bulbs. They did produce very good quality photos. I had to develop and print the photos. I first learned developing in high-school. Then I graduated to the Canon AE-1.

So I think I've done a small amount of photography before the digital era was born. Oh, and I've done the occassional wedding too.

Ron
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 8:24 PM   #14
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Well this board seems to be pretty evenly split then. For some reason I thought that the majority would have done photography before digital... hmm.

Anyways, all I know is that if I was a film photographer I would be a VERY poor man. Because on average, I delete 2/3 of my pictures on sight.
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 10:49 PM   #15
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Morag2 wrote:
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Because on average, I delete 2/3 of my pictures on sight.

Sounds like me today....we went to an event and were not very close and of course, right now I only have a 3x zoom so out of the 195 photos I took, I trashed 106 of them and I still need to go through again, those I kept. :OI couldn't imagine what I would do now if it were not for digital! lol
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Old Jul 27, 2006, 12:34 PM   #16
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Well, I might be the old man in this group. I started in 1951 with a "Beautyflex" twin-lens reflex (don't ask!) which was a Japanese ripoff of the noble German Rolleiflex--back when Japanese was a pejorative. It was pretty crappy, so when I volunteered to be the high-school press photographer, my father bought me a Rolleicord, a nice low-end Rolleiflex. I did a lot of BW photography through the years, and still have my old Omega B-6 enlarger. I did a little color printing, but it was not a lot of fun. I also still have my 50-year-old Rolleiflex (120 film, 6x6 cm square) with Schneider Xenar f:3.5 lens (I do like that my P880 has a Schneider lens!), and My Nikomat (overseas version of the Nikkormat 35mmSLR, a 1970-era lower-end Nikon.) And a nice suite of 6 Nikkor lenses, from 20mm to 200 mm. Far too much to carry.

Talking about cost: How about my old Nikon Super-8 movie camera that cost over $10 for film and processing for a 3 1/2 minute film? Or my excellent 16mm Swiss-made Bolex H-16 Supreme camera that cost$12 for a 4-minute reel of filmand another $10 for processing? This was back when rib steak cost 39 cents a pound. I sure didn't use that one much.

I bought my first digital camera in March 1997. It was a Ricoh RX-2, an 860k(!) digital camera which was fun, but pretty poor in image quality. At over $600! We have come a LONG WAY in 10 years.

My wife and I have gone through Nikon 800 (2Mp), 880 (3.2Mp), Canon S-200 (2Mp), S-320 (3.2Mp), and now her Canon SD-400 (4 Mp) and my Kodak P880.

Darkroom work was a lot of fun in BW because of the magic watching pictures appear. But especially with color, it rapidly became plain old work. Having my pictures and videos on my computers lets me do far more creative stuff than film ever could, regardless of the cost. And it's actually MUCH cheaper!

For example, printing paper used to be made in four or five "grades" which you would have to keep on hand and choose according to whether your negative was very contrasty or not. You'd do this by experience and by trial and error (mostly the latter). It could easily take a half dozen prints before you got one good one. On any mid-level editing software you just move a slider to do the same thing as you watch, It's called "Gamma" or "Levels". Try it!

And color? You had to work in TOTAL darkness for 10-15 minutes, and it took at least 30 minutes before you could even tell if the print was going to be OK! The solutions had to be temperature controlled to 1/2 degree F for best color. And you needed to put a stack of color-correcting filters over your enlarger lens (and go through the 1/2 hr. process) to fix any color errors. Another slider in the editing software.

BTW: I have been a Kodak fan for many years because they have always been a very ethical company. For example, they have continued to produce film varieties foryears after their market dwindled away just so camera owners, and especially scientific users, wouldn't be stranded. I am really happy to see that they are now becoming the most innovative manufacturer around.

Oh, yes--I had to walk 3 miles to school every day, too :-)

Have fun!

Bob
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Old Jul 27, 2006, 8:17 PM   #17
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Bob,

Your walk to school, was that three miles up hill both ways?
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Old Jul 27, 2006, 9:37 PM   #18
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First got a hand me down Kodak twin lens reflex 620 roll film camera from my dad when I was about ten. The fellow down the street taught me how to develop film and make prints. In high school I first used an Argus 35mm rangefinder, then a Petri 35mm SLR and finally made the big time my senior year with loaner pro gear from the company that had our yearbook portraitcontract. To get out of the activities clause they loaned me a Mamiya C330 twin lens reflex with three different lenses and 120 roll film cassettesand a Grayflex strobe that could give you a sunburn at fifty feet andwas powered by a 510v battery pack about half the size and weight of a car battery. I had no trouble lighting players on the other end of the football field and frequently blinded basketball players indoors.

After high school I got serious and bought a Nikon F1 and lenses and a Honeywell Strobonar for wedding receptions and sports and used a Bronica medium format for formal wedding photos in the church and portrait work. Always wanted a Hasselblad but could never make that much money.

Years later I owned a slew of Olympus OM series 35mm bodies and lenses and made the switch to Minolta when the SRT series came along. A few years later it was Nikon FM series and then Canon AE-1.

I gave it all up for many years and then got back into it just before digital came along and used a variety of Canon and Nikon 35mm SLRs. The first digital was a Kodak DC40, then the DC50 and finally the DC120. Then I discovered the Nikon Coolpix 900, followed by the 950, 990, 995 and 4500 and my first dSLR was the Canon D30 and the rest is history-- read all about it here:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/hardware_reviews.html


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Old Jul 27, 2006, 10:09 PM   #19
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i have seen a few real estate agents using the V570 or P880 for shots to put on the web because of the wide angle lenses.

**The V570 can also do in-camera stitching for nice indoor or outdoor panoramics up to 180 degrees wide. seems made for real estate agents and landscapers...



FaciaBrut wrote:
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Ken, I haven't used one personally, but my company uses '3D virtual tours' a lot. Our head photographer shoots all the high end properties and also does the Virtual Tours using a system called iPix. He shoots the property room by room, then runs the image files through some software to generate the Virtual Tour. Here's a sample:

http://media.homestore.com/idx/HTS74349.htm
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Old Jul 27, 2006, 11:46 PM   #20
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Haha, my topic got a post from the great Steve himself:blah:

I had no idea you're first cameras were Kodak's Steve!! Maybe I'll have my own massive web forum someday too:lol:
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