Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Kodak

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 24, 2006, 3:06 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
indianguy077's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 198
Default

Hi friends

Here is questin about ISO realted, we see the iso settings like 80,100,200,400,800 or more. mostly all simple pics are taken in 80 to 200 iso settings, But when we need 400 or 800 or more iso settings in any camera.

Any one have some pics taken in higher ISO settings .

Please i m looking for this .....


Regard
indianguy077 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 24, 2006, 8:37 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
scrappynik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 486
Default

I find the higher the ISO, the more "noise" there seems to be in the photo. I try to shoot in just ISO 50. I do still use the auto settings occasionally but am not sure what those are set at.
scrappynik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2006, 9:02 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
wizbummer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 309
Default

nik is right, in my experience with various kodaks, ISO 200 is the max I would go to prevent really noticeable noise. Most will only go up to ISO 800, and doing so changes the resolution you can shoot at. dSLRs have the capability to go all the way up to ISO 1600 without getting huge amounts of noise!

nik, in the auto mode, when you half-press the shutter and it locks the focus, it should show your apeture and exposure settings at the bottom, but I think ISO is still manually selected!
wizbummer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2006, 9:46 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 7
Default

Indianguy, the higher ISO settings will allow you to take photos in lower light situations, but like the others have said...it will give you more noise in the photos. I keep my ISO setting as low as possible by using a wider aperture, slower shutter speed and a tripod in the low light situations. If all that fails (or isn't practical at the time), bump the ISO up and then run the photos through a noise reduction software (I use noiseware).

Hope this helps.
WVButterfly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2006, 10:29 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
bigdawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thach Alabama
Posts: 14,981
Default

Go here and look at these!

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=18

and here are some low light shots!

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=18

And here at the bottom of the page I posted the EXIF data for the photos.

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=18

Dawg
bigdawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 25, 2006, 7:19 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
indianguy077's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 198
Default

WVButterfly wrote:
Thanks WVButterfly for your comments, i 100% agree with your commnets about low light shoots, As we can see on various sites reg ISO they write , Higer ISO use in action in low light or Indoor shot wheterh flash is not allowed, but anyway i m looking more for that.

Thanks
Quote:
Indianguy, the higher ISO settings will allow you to take photos in lower light situations, but like the others have said...it will give you more noise in the photos. I keep my ISO setting as low as possible by using a wider aperture, slower shutter speed and a tripod in the low light situations. If all that fails (or isn't practical at the time), bump the ISO up and then run the photos through a noise reduction software (I use noiseware).

Hope this helps.
indianguy077 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:02 PM.