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-   -   Ccd shift anti shake (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/konica-minolta-26/ccd-shift-anti-shake-31482/)

redmikee Aug 12, 2004 4:08 PM

The Z3 uses an anti shake system called ccd shift which as i understand it doesn't use an additional lens so is more compact and lighter, but is one system better than the other or is it down to other factors such as build quality?

James Bond 007 Aug 13, 2004 2:43 AM

According to Z3 owners, the anti-shake works fine and they can gain 3 f-stops with it, similarly to lens-based stabilization.

The only problem could be overheating, as the Z3 manual says. The LCD, AS mechanism and the CCD are too close to each other.

Technophile Aug 13, 2004 3:47 AM

For a fixed lens camera like the Z3 or FZ20 it doesn't really matter whether you put the IS in the lens or the body. The Minolta mechanism comes into its own with the dSLR and interchangeable lenses. You don't have to put the IS in every lens. Also you get a simple mechanism to shake the CCD to get rid of dust, like the Oly E1.

JimC Aug 13, 2004 1:20 PM

Technophile wrote:
Quote:

Also you get a simple mechanism to shake the CCD to get rid of dust, like the Oly E1.
Actually, if you read the recent interview concerning the new DSLR withKeiichi Ishizuka (General Manager of the Konica Minolta Development Center), he indicated thatanti-shake would not work for dust removal. See page 3:

"Helberg: It is often a concern of Digital SLR users that dust on the CCD can cause a problem. Is it possible to shake off the dust with the Anti-Shake function?

[align=left]Ishizuka:
The mechanism for CCD shift type Anti-Shake is not for dust reduction, however we tested to check its effect for dust reduction. We concluded that it's not suitable to use it as a dust reduction feature. Instead we will employ anti-statistic treatment for parts used inside, like a shutter unit."[/align]
[align=left]http://www.steves-digicams.com/pdf/dynax7_interview.pdf[/align]

microsaftcom Aug 15, 2004 4:30 PM

It is spelled "Patents"

It was a work around to avoid infringing on patents held by Canon and Panasonic and others.

However K-M got a nice thing going and noone else can follow.

This gives them the upper hand for the next 70 years or so.

/F



Technophile Aug 16, 2004 3:05 AM

So, he's saying the Olympus mechanism dust removal mechanism doesn't work. Interesting.

NHL Aug 16, 2004 7:19 AM

The difference can be attributed to the E1's CCD staying fixed, whereas the Minolta's CCD is moving rubbing one surface against another "creating" static... ;)

ie the E1 is more like a vibration instead of true X-Y displacements as in the Minolta.

JimC Aug 16, 2004 8:32 AM

Technophile wrote:
Quote:

So, he's saying the Olympus mechanism dust removal mechanism doesn't work. Interesting.
It's totally different. The Olympus uses an ultrasonic system designed specifically for dust removal from it's stationary CCD.



JimC Aug 16, 2004 8:37 AM

microsaftcom wrote:
Quote:

It is spelled "Patents"

It was a work around to avoid infringing on patents held by Canon and Panasonic and others.

However K-M got a nice thing going and noone else can follow.

This gives them the upper hand for the next 70 years or so.

/F



Chances are, IS and mechanical anti-shake will be virtually obsolete within the next 5-7 years anyway. I think we'll be seeing systems designed to reduce motion blur electronically, as we are already seeing in some video cameras.It's only a matter of sampling multiple frames from the CCD at a high rate for a single still photo, then using the same type of algorithms already developed for video cams (which will continue to improve).



Technophile Aug 17, 2004 3:31 AM

I'd be very surprised if that technique would ever work for still cameras. Video cameras are a different animal.All the still camera can do is try to account for camera motion - the operative word being camera - and that's all IS does. Trying to look at the image (which may be of a moving subject) and apply algorithms to itmight be a bit tricky.


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