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Old Sep 22, 2006, 7:10 PM   #1
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I raised this problem a few months ago. I still haven't found an explanation yet.

I take a photo inside a gloomy building without flash. I do so in the simplest possible way - leaving the camera to choose aperture, shutter speed and ISO.

When I get the result on my computer screen I find an image that seems entirely black.

Making truly massive adjustments to brightness and contrast in Photoshop I find there is indeed a recognisableimage there. Sometimes I may even be able to arrive at a tolerably usable photo.

When I look at the image's data I find that the camera has indeed chosen maximum aperture and also a realistic shutter speed (such as 1/4 second), but it has chosen ISO 50, which is of course ridiculous. Hence the black image.

I can't think of any explanation for the camera's crazy choice of ISO except that its software is flawed. If the conditions are gloomy enough it is just incapable of making an intelligent choice of ISO.I find this a rather depressing conclusion. Any other ideas?
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Old Sep 23, 2006, 1:00 PM   #2
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Select a higher ISO speed if you want faster shutter speeds and Auto ISO doesn't increase the ISO speed as high as you'd like. Using a lower ISO speed is not going to be the cause of your exposure problem though (unless you're already at the slowest shutter speed the camera would normally use in a given mode).

Do you even have ISO speed set to Auto ISO versus a fixed ISO speed?

My guess is Not (as this model will typically vary ISO speed from 50 to 200 in most modes if using Auto ISO based on user reports I've seen). Note that a given setting may not transfer between all modes either (so, make sure you set it with the mode dial in the position you are using).

You'll find a user guide for your camera here (ISO speed is under the Function menu).

http://ca.konicaminolta.com/support/...e-a/index.html

I'd also suggest looking for the RESET menu choice you'll find, in case you've made settings changes that negatively impact your images (which is what your posts lead me to suspect).


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I raised this problem a few months ago. I still haven't found an explanation yet.
You were deliberately underexposing by using a -EV setting with Exposure Compensation. They're supposed to come out darker if you do that. ;-)

See my responses in your last thread on this subject:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...499486#p499486

Reset your camera back to factory defaults and see if that clears up your issues.

You've probably made settings changes that are causing your problems (Exposure Compensation, ISO speed, Metering Mode, Contrast, etc.).

Then, if you still have issues, post some examples of problem photos and let members offer some suggestions.

Also note that most cameras' matrix metering algorithms (if your camera is even set to Matrix versus Spot or Center Weighted) will give more weight to your focus point.

So, it's a good idea to be aware of that if you use a brighter object as a focus point when there is a big difference in brightness within the scene you're shooting.

Any camera's metering takes some getting used to, and once you understand it's behavior, you can use features like Exposure Compensation so that the camera's exposure algorithms expose the scene brighter or darker than it would normally expose it in the same conditions.

That's what it's there for (Exposure Compensation allows you to expose the scene brighter or darker than the camera's metering thinks it needs to be exposed).

But, my guess is that you've made some settings changes that are causing most of your issues, based on your last thread on this subject (since I have not noticed similar complaints from other A200 users).

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Old Sep 23, 2006, 3:26 PM   #3
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Sorry Steve, I don't see a solution there.

The problem is simply:I give the camera the freedom to choose the ISO value, and it chooses a ridiculous value and so takes a ridiculous photo.
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Old Sep 23, 2006, 4:15 PM   #4
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Bart150 wrote:
Quote:
Sorry Steve, I don't see a solution there.
I'm Jim, not Steve.


Quote:
The problem is simply:I give the camera the freedom to choose the ISO value, and it chooses a ridiculous value and so takes a ridiculous photo.
Attachment: x31132.jpg
That photo was taken on September 11th.

Did you reset it back to factory defaults and make sure the ISO speed was set to Auto ISO (which is designed to vary it between 50 and 200)?

That photo was at ISO 50 (but, you may have it set that way, as this camera is designed to vary it between 50 and 200 if using Auto ISO).

You'll find the RESET menu choice explained on Page 93 of the manual

You'll find the ISO speed menus explained on Page 66.

How about Exposure Compensation? I see a -1 EV setting for that photo according to the EXIF. See Page 59 for setting Exposure Compensation. If you set it to a -EV value, you're going to get a darker image. ;-) It's supposed to work that way.

http://ca.konicaminolta.com/support/...00/A200_Eb.pdf

If resetting it back to defaults doesn't help, you may not have enough light for the camera to meter the scene. Even a DSLR can't meter in light much lower than around 0 EV (and a non-DSLR's metering is not going to work that well). Lower than that, you go manual exposure and experiment.

See the Troubleshooting Section on page 162 of the manual (where it explains possible problems if your subject is too dark or too bright (with one of them being a red metering indicator).

http://ca.konicaminolta.com/support/...00/A200_Eb.pdf

Any camera needs some light. ;-)

But, chances are, your settings are the primary problem. Reset the camera back to defaults and see if that solves it (making sure you're set to Auto ISO and Exposure Compensation is not set to a -EV value).

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Old Sep 23, 2006, 5:09 PM   #5
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Thanks, Jim.

I've now come to the following view: Photographing in a gloomy building you can use the automatic functions of the A200 to get acceptable photos most of the time. But the automatic functions of the A200do need a certain minimum amount of light in order to function properly and this is a surprisingly sharp cutoff point:slightly above the minimum and everything is fine, slightly below andthe result is not justrather poor; instead the result is utter garbage.

This hypothesis isbased on over 5000 shots (maybe 300 of themgarbage in the above sense) that I've taken this year with the A200 inside buildings.


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Old Sep 23, 2006, 7:32 PM   #6
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Any camera's "automatic functions" need a certain amount of light to meter and focus. ;-)

The A series KM models are better than most. But, any camera has limitations.

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