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Old Jun 8, 2003, 5:07 PM   #1
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Default Minolta and ACTION shots !


I'm new here, but not all that new to Minolta. I have a wonderful 35mm from them, and then got into digital cameras and bought the Olympus C-2100 Ultra Zoom. Well, I'm not going to buy another Olympus, so I've been searching for the best digital camera for my needs. I love to photograph birds, bugs, flowers. I need to know from the experienced people that own a Minolta digital, if photographing flight/wing/action shots can be done with the Minolta Dimage 7i or 7Hi . And I have a b-300 lens already I used on my olympus , and read that the lens can be used with the dimage. I'm a big fan of ''ADD ON" lens' , and would really appreciate some feedback on the Minolta Dimage 7 series cameras for action shots. I guess I'll have to get use to any camera without the 10x optical , but the dimage has atleast 7x optical , that's not bad at all. Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated !
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Old Jun 8, 2003, 7:51 PM   #2
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I have the D7 and my friend has the D7i, so I can talk to those two cameras, but not the D7Hi.

By action shots I assume you mean fast moving subjects. Both the D7 and D7i have horendously slow autofocus, quite unsuitable for *action* shots. By the time the autofocus focuses, your shot may be long gone - assuming even that the camera will even give you a focus lock, it often just outright fails to focus.

There is a solution, however. Switch the camera to manual focus mode. As long as your subjects are not too close, you can just set the focus to infinity and leave it there. In this situitation, the D7(i) will respond with minimal shutter lag when you press the shutter release button. In this mode, the camera must only determine exposure, so it is quite quick.

You can even speed this up by slightly pressing the shutter release if you are getting ready to take a shot. The camera determines exposure when you slightly press the shutter release button, just keep the shutter slightly depressed, then press all the way to actually take the photo.

Nice camera, great optics and great images, just lousy autofocus.

Declan
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Old Jun 8, 2003, 8:02 PM   #3
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Thank you Declan for your reply and advise ! I'm quite use to using manual focus and also the ''half-way'' shutter press and then pressing all the way to take the photo. So, seems like that won't be much of a problem for me. But as far as having to turn/move the focusing ring , like on a 35mm, does that interfere with the way I might have to zoom in and turn with left hand for both of these actions? I'm wondering how coordinated I'm going to have to be with the camera being a digital and using the focus ring at the same time. Again , thanks for helping me out.
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Old Jun 9, 2003, 11:39 AM   #4
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Manually focusing and zooming is really no problem. Thumb and index finger for zooming, middle finger for focus.

However, the best and easiest is if you can just set the focus to infinity and forget about it.

Manual focusing, per say, is almost impossible. The EVF just does not have the resolution to allow you to see things clearly enough, and even with the 4x zoom as a focusing aid, I still find it too difficult to *see* what I am trying to focus on.

Even if you can see the focusing clearly enough, all the fiddeling around with the 4x zoom on the EVF would make focusing manually probably much slower than the autofocus.

Set it and forget it, that's what I do. Okay, well maybe not quite forget it. You do need to keep an eye on the focus setting in the viewfinder to make sure you have not accidently moved the focus off your preset point.

Again, I consider the autofocus/focus system to be the one major flaw in this otherwise excellent little camera.

My solution: I bought a Fuji S2, and now I am a really happy camper.

Hope that helps.

Declan
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Old Jun 9, 2003, 11:49 AM   #5
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[/i]Hi Declan, thanks. I'm going to check out the camera you bought. I appreciate the time and advise from you. Focusing on subjects is a major need in photography - duh! , and that's one thing I don't want to compromise. Again , thanks !
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Old Jun 9, 2003, 11:55 AM   #6
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Quote:
There is a solution, however. Switch the camera to manual focus mode. As long as your subjects are not too close, you can just set the focus to infinity and leave it there. In this situitation, the D7(i) will respond with minimal shutter lag when you press the shutter release button. In this mode, the camera must only determine exposure, so it is quite quick.
I have the 7i. How do I set it to infinity?[/quote]
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Old Jun 9, 2003, 12:08 PM   #7
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Hey Declan, I can't find the Fuji S2 , is there another name for it ? I'm seeing lots of S series with #'s along with the name , but not S2 .
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Old Jun 9, 2003, 1:34 PM   #8
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Quote:
I have the 7i. How do I set it to infinity?
Left side of camera: the AF/MF button, once the MF is shown in the EVF turn the focus ring toward the infinity icon! Also if you wait for the camera to lock AF, you can the just overide the camera by turning the focusing toward infinity as well (it's called DMF, Direct Manual Focusing overide) without having to switch to manual focus 1st... Also if you don't release the shutter all the way (keep it 1/2 pressed) you can follow up with subsequent shots as quick as you can press the shutter release.
BTW if you put the whole camera on manual (ie even the exposure) it's even faster still since it's WYSIWYG, ie What You See is What You Get! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Fuji S2:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2002_reviews/s2.html
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Old Jun 9, 2003, 8:01 PM   #9
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Fuji S2 Pro. It is a dSLR and significantly more $$$ than the D7. Most review sites will list it under dSLR, or maybe 5+ megapixel (it's 6MP).

Steve should have a review of it somewhere on this site.

I read that it has dropped in price recently.

Declan
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Old Jun 9, 2003, 8:10 PM   #10
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Thank you very much for letting me know. If the price isn't too high, you gotta look at it like this - if it's worth it you'll pay for it ! Thanks !
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