Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Konica Minolta

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 1, 2008, 9:17 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 27
Default

Hi,

I am the proud new owner of an A2. It should arrive today or tomorrow.

I went with this camera because as far as I can tell, it is THE non DSLR camera for manual focusing. After years of out of focus pictures of my kids playing basketball or soccer, I decided I needed to have the ability to do the focusing myself.

I am now looking at external flashes. There are a few made my KM for the A2, but they ain't cheap! There are others by various manufacturers that can be had for a fraction of the cost. The HS adapter can be bought for almost nothing on ebay, so that's not much of an issue.

Do the dedicated KM models perform much better? Do they "talk" to the camera more effectively than others, thereby giving improved results?

BTW, I bought this used on ebay. I got an extra battery, polarizing filters, 4gig card, and a shutter release cable. It also has a transferable mack camera warantee, good till 2010. It is $15 to transfer it.I paid $280 including shipping. I think this was a pretty good deal. What do you folks think?
pete9686 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 1, 2008, 10:16 AM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

In addition to the Minolta flashes like the 2500 (D), 3600HS (D) and 5600HS (D), you can also use the rebranded Sony equivalents like the Sony HVL-36AM (rebranded Minolta 3600HS), and Sony HVL-56AM (rebranded Minolta 5600HS). The smaller 2500(D) was not carried over to the Sony line (no equivalent for that one).

The dedicated flashes communicate with the camera and are aware of settings for ISO speed and aperture. They also have features like an AF assist lamp. In addition, you have the ability to use the 3600HS/HVL-36AM or 5600HS/HVL-56AM wirelessly off camera (using the camera's built in flash to signal it).

With a non-dedicated flash via an FS-1100 type adapter, you'd need to use manual exposure on the camera and set your aperture and ISO speed on the camera and flash to match for the range you're shooting at. A popular non-dedicated model would be something like a Sunpak 383 Super.

If you decide to go with a non-dedicated flash via an adapter, make sure to keep trigger voltages in mind to keep from damaging your camera (the Sunpak I mentioned would be OK, but many flashes are not OK without protection if you want to trigger them via your hotshoe).

Trigger Voltage Limits with Modern Digital Cameras

You can get a voltage protected adapter from this reputable Hong Kong based vendor (and they also carry a less expensive adapter without voltage protection):

http://www.gadgetinfinity.com/produc...275&page=1

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 1, 2008, 7:15 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 27
Default

Thanks Jim. I guess that answers my question. I will get a dedicated flash. I like manual controls on a camera, but, I do like like the option of letting the camera do the thinking some time.
pete9686 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2008, 5:47 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 39
Default

There's also a small Minolta flash - the SF1, made for the Vectis range. This also works on an A2!
TonySx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2008, 6:13 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 27
Default

I'll check it out tony. Is it dedicated? Will it be much of an improvement over the built in?
Pete
pete9686 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 6, 2008, 7:28 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 39
Default

Here are the details from the 'instruction manual'.
TYPE: Fully dedicated autoflash with AF Illuminator for
Minolta Vectis series cameras.
EXPOSURE CONTROL: Direct autoflash metering in all flash
exposure modes.
GUIDE NUMBER: 28 in metres at ISO 200.
TonySx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 6, 2008, 8:06 AM   #7
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

This flash model was introduced in 1996, and from everything I've found out about it, it's not compatible with newer digital cameras. It appears to be designed to work with off the film flash metering, versus the way the newer digital compatible models are designed to work using a metering preflash instead. Older flash models can't handle the communications from the newer digital cameras for the metering preflash.

So, what happens with these types of flashes is they always fire at same power level, regardless of camera settings (since the camera doesn't see any reflected light from a metering preflash, since the flash isn't firing one, it never varies the flash burst length).

TonySx

Do you have a KM Digital Camera and this flash? Have you tried to see what happens if you go closer to a subject, and then further away from a subject using it with the same camera settings? My guess is that you'll see a brighter exposure as you get closer, and a darker exposure as you get further away. I doubt the flash burst length is varying at all with camera settings or subject distance. So, you'd probably get an overexposed image at closer ranges unless you stop down your aperture.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 6, 2008, 6:12 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 39
Default

JimC wrote:
Quote:
This flash model was introduced in 1996, and from everything I've found out about it, it's not compatible with newer digital cameras.* It appears to be designed to work with off the film flash metering, versus the way the newer digital compatible models are designed to work using a metering preflash instead.** Older flash models can't handle the communications from the newer digital cameras for the metering preflash.

So, what happens with these types of flashes is they always fire at same power level, regardless of camera settings (since the camera doesn't see any reflected light from a metering preflash, since the flash isn't firing one, it never varies the flash burst length).

Do you have a KM Digital Camera and this flash?* Have you tried to see what happens if you go closer to a subject, and then further away from a subject using it with the same camera settings?** My guess is that you'll see a brighter exposure as you get closer, and a darker exposure as you get further away.** I doubt the flash burst length is varying at all with camera settings or subject distance.* So, you'd probably get an overexposed image at closer ranges unless you stop down your aperture.
Yes, and the results. They probably support what you say.
All 3 shots were taken with my A2 (since that's what the OP was interested in!). The first 2 were using the SF-1 flash and the third was using the A2's built in flash. All shots were taken RAW and have had no PP except to rotate them 90° and convert them to JPG. The second shop was about 6' closer to the front door than the other 2. I think they show that the SF-1 flash is a bit more powerful than the built-in flash!







Also in explanation, I don't use this flash much since I also have a 5400HS flash which works on nearly all my cameras well, all the Minoltas...........
TonySx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 6, 2008, 6:38 PM   #9
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

The 5400HS has the same problem with digital (always firing at the same power level).

But, you can modify it to work properly with newer digital cameras (KM A1, A2, 5D, 7D). See this page for details:

http://www.voitzsch.net/flashconv_en.shtml

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 6, 2008, 7:28 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 39
Default

JimC wrote:
Quote:
The 5400HS has the same problem with digital (always firing at the same power level).

But, you can modify it to work properly with newer digital cameras (KM A1, A2, 5D, 7D).* See this page for details:

http://www.voitzsch.net/flashconv_en.shtml
Thanks for that info. So far I haven't had any trouble using the 5400 on my RD3000, A2 or 7D. But I always shoot RAW (TIFF with the RD3000) and PP whenever necessary......

And, actually, the 7D has a setting to set the flash power so that helps.
TonySx is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:57 AM.