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Old Dec 4, 2003, 2:02 PM   #1
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Default Dimage 7Hi and A1

Can anyone tell me what the difference is in the Minolta DiMAGE 7Hi Digital Camera and the A1? The only difference I can find is in the shutter speed and the price. Othewise, they look and seem to be identical.
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Old Dec 4, 2003, 10:23 PM   #2
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Default A bunch of differences

Steves reveiw point them out so you may want to take a look.
A1 has image stabilization none with 7HI
A1 has noise reduction but not the 7HI
A1 has a better auto focus system
A1 has a proprietary battery Good or Bad???

A1 seems to address the issues I have had with my 7HI. 7HI which is pretty good but the images have quite a bit of noise. If you go to Steves sample images for both and look for simiar images with a lot of blue sky, download them and open them at 100% and you will see a real difference in the quality.
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Old Dec 5, 2003, 12:07 AM   #3
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the 7Hi has a UHS mode that at lower res allows 30+ shots to be made. it was quite handy for my daughters gymnastics. miss that.
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Old Dec 5, 2003, 4:46 PM   #4
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Default thanks

Thanks hst. I missed this comparison, but read up on it now. I'm seriously considering a Minolta A1, as soon as the bank account will allow.
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Old Dec 7, 2003, 9:09 AM   #5
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Default Definately not a point and shoot

One more thing you might want to consider before purchasing. The 7i/7HI/A1 are definately not point and shoot cameras. To get good image quality you have to do some manual settings. I have used the auto mode and got frustrated with the poor image quality. They can take some great resolute images but you have to work on learning the camera to get them. It does have one of the best Macro modes and takes great close-up photos which the primary reason I purchased the camera. If I had it to do all over again, however; I would have looked for a different camera. I expected a lot more for the price.
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Old Dec 7, 2003, 9:29 AM   #6
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Not True

it does require a little setting (which in itself is a fam exercise) up but after that on cruise control it does quite well on its own.
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Old Dec 7, 2003, 9:37 AM   #7
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Default UHS

I got my first 35mm back around 1975 and still use a 35mm that is mostly manual. I'm more comfortable with a manual camera anyway. I am not a pro photographer, but enjoy taking pics and have done a few weddings and even entered a few contests. Anyway, as long as the manual settings aren't too complicated, I shouldn't have much of a problem. A camera with a good manual focus and manual light settings would be fine.

Another choice for a digital would be this new Canon EOS Rebel. What do you think of it. I've read good and bad about it as well.

Now, to show my lack of vocabulary, what is a UHS?

Jack
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Old Dec 7, 2003, 9:53 AM   #8
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ultra hi speed mode
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Old Dec 7, 2003, 10:23 PM   #9
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Default Digital Rebel

Let me clarify the manual settings. I'm not talking about everything, just tweeking its settings so the images look good. Setting the ISO manually to 100 for most shots, helps a great deal. Choosing your shutter priority works good. I wasn't trying to say full manual. If you haven't looked you might want to check out cnet.com review or some of the other reviews steves-digicams is linked to.

I have considered the Rebel to and almost bought one. I would have if I hadn't already spent the money on this camera. The images in the reviews look great and the ISO can be high and still give good images. I'm not sure how it feels or how easily it would be to carry around with its size. I also am somewhat skeptical about the plastic body. Someone with one could probably give some good advice.
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Old Dec 8, 2003, 12:25 AM   #10
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look they're all limited by the very technology their pushing. there is where the big difference is in film based cameras. the electro/mechnacical stuff was matured and well executed. all you had to do is put the film in and shoot. this wonderfully new tech is being held before us with mass marketing on how fantastic it is but lets face it, it is at this point no where near worked out yet. we're paying for the R&D now.

film still has more latitude in more ways then digital but its that instant gratafication in digital we love so much.

in 2-3 months a whole new series of arguments (digital wonders to surpass our current digital wonders)are being developed and packaged for marketing at the shows in the spring.

i liked it somewhat better when i had a good body/lens and used a variety of film.

the bad thing about digital is your stuck with the "film" you get with it.
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