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Old Feb 20, 2004, 5:20 PM   #1
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Default Minolta A1 gets warm during use -- problem or normal?

Greetings. I love my Minolta A1 -- but am concerned as the hand grip side and the bottom of the camera get very warm to the touch during extended use 20-30 mins ... like during a basketball game ... I've been told by a camera shop person who didn't examine the camera that it was simply heat from my hand ... now, I'm a hotty for sure , but I'm still nervous about that. Is this a trait of the A1? Is it the warmth of my hand? Is it a problem with the camera or the rechargeable proprietary battery it uses? Thoughts?
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Old Feb 20, 2004, 6:54 PM   #2
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That is normal for the A1.
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Old Feb 20, 2004, 8:47 PM   #3
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The battery will disapate heat normally. I don't think you have a reason to be concerned.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 3:24 PM   #4
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Even though it's normal for the A1 to generate heat as stated in this thread. Heat does affect the CCD and that is a fact. COOL=BETTER PICS. Just for the fun of it I would try the following test ( I don't have an A1 so I can't do the test for you ).
Take a shot in an air-conditioned room after the camera has adjusted to that temperature.
Turn on the camera and take the same shot 30 minutes later when you say that the camera gets very warm to the touch.
Since the heat is generated from the bottom it must travel up ((unless they have it insulated some how)) and possibly effecting the CCD in a negative way.
If your at the basketball game to take shots for a business you have no choice but to leave it on most of the time.
If not and after your test you see a difference in image quality just turn it on when your ready to shoot.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 4:20 PM   #5
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... Or shake the camera, the "antishake" will then "wing" the CCD around! :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 7:26 PM   #6
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Since it will be the lcd that's taking over half the power, can't you toggle the display on and off?

On my S414 I've got in the habit of pushing the display button with my thumb as often as the shutter, and the batts last much longer and stay cooler. This is my crude approach to energy management, because Dimage seems to stand for 'power thirsty' but linear! VOX
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 9:32 PM   #7
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The A1 has this nifty feature called a 'grip sensor'. It detects when you are holding the camera [by the hand grip] and can be programmed to control switching the EVF on/off.

My personal preference is to normally use the EVF for framing under most shooting circumstances. As such, I have my A1 set to use the 'grip sensor' to turn on the EVF when I'm (a) holding the cam and (b) I'm actually aiming the camera to take a shot [there is an 'eye-start' detector senses when your eye is near the EVF]. This combo allows the camera to be kept in a powered up state so it is quick to respond yet use minimum energy since the displays are mostly switched off until actually needed. The grip and eye-start sensors are quigh enough that the EVF is already on as you grab the camera and bring it to your eye.

Also, I only switch on the AS when long exposure conditions exist [i.e., no point having AS active heating things up and sucking down battery juice when the shutter setting is 1/250 sec!]
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 4:57 AM   #8
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It sounds like they are doing what they can to manage power, but I still think they've got to reduce the consumption. When I'm taking photos, I don't like the pressure of thinking power management all the time. Incidentally, I did some tests on a couple of cameras thinking the EVF would be a fraction of the power of the lcd. I was wrong. The EVF takes a little less - but not that much. VOX
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 10:14 AM   #9
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Quote:
As such, I have my A1 set to use the 'grip sensor' to turn on the EVF when I'm (a) holding the cam and (b) I'm actually aiming the camera to take a shot [there is an 'eye-start' detector senses when your eye is near the EVF.

Let me get this straight: the EVF is only active when your eye is to the viewfinder but you have the grip sensor set to turn the EVF off if you are trying to look through the viewfinder but arenít holding the handgrip? Seems silly for Minolta to even offer the option but it seems sillier to use the grip sensor for that. When would you have your eye to the viewfinder and not want it active?

The primary use for the grip sensor is for the continuous/tracking focus. It is a great feature but uses more battery, and the grip sensor is a nice feature to keep that under control.
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 7:56 PM   #10
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slipe wrote
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Let me get this straight: the EVF is only active when your eye is to the viewfinder but you have the grip sensor set to turn the EVF off if you are trying to look through the viewfinder but arenít holding the handgrip? Seems silly for Minolta to even offer the option but it seems sillier to use the grip sensor for that. When would you have your eye to the viewfinder and not want it active?
Let me clarify; I have the camera set to require a hand on the grip sensor AND an eye near the EVF to turn ON the EVF. If either one of these conditions is not met, the EVF is off. Page 135 of the manual cites this setting for conserving battery power.

Having the grip sensor in the logic equation is not so silly at all. The UV detector for the 'eye-start' can be triggered by other UV sources such as having the eye piece in close proximity to your body such as when the camera hangs from the neck strap, thus unintentiionally wasting energy.

There is a three position switch on the A1 that allows you to select the EVF to be on all of the time, or you can select the LCD to be on all of the time or you can select 'auto'. The auto operation can be further refined such that the LCD is on until you hold the EVF up to your eye; the 'eye-start' sensor turns off the LCD and turns on the EVF. Or the auto can be set to turn on the EVF if the 'eye-start' sensor detects your eye near by. And, as mentioned above, the A1 can be programmed to ONLY honor the 'eye-start' signal when the hand grip sensor detects that you are holding the camera.
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