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Old Sep 19, 2002, 9:03 PM   #1
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Default DMF vs MF

Can anyone tell me the difference between direct manual focus and manual focus? I recently bought a 7i and am having a lot of shots that are blurred or not real clear. Thanks
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Old Sep 19, 2002, 10:22 PM   #2
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If the 7i works the same as the 7 upgrade, the main difference is that it's harder to use the 4X mag button with DMF than with MF. You'll have to copy and paste the url and fix the spaces that this forum software throws in, but there's some discussion of it here:http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/...eid=1031921586
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Old Sep 20, 2002, 5:13 AM   #3
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gtwilson

In MF, the D7i is totally a manual focus camera. Activating the 4x magnify the image so one can easily focus on the detail while adjusting the focusing ring.

DMF achieves the same thing but in the autofocus mode. The only caveat is the shutter release has to be 1/2 pressed to override the camera with the manual focusing ring! One can also use the thumb here to activate the 4x while holding the shutter 1/2 way down with the index finger to achieve the previous feat in MF. The less dexterous way is to set the SPOT button to AF/AE toggle, this will lock focus in DMF without having to use the shutter release and the fingers are freed up to do other tasks (ie color bracketing, exposure comp, etc...)

http://www.stevesforums.com/forum/vi...d.php?tid=2821

Pretty smart camera HE?
:P:P:P



BTW pay close attention to shutter speed! The AF or MF may work just fine, but watch out for the tele because if the shutter speed is below the inverse of the focal lenght you'll get blurred pictures due to camera shake... and not in anyway related to the camera focus.

[Edited on 9-20-2002 by NHL]
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Old Sep 20, 2002, 8:45 PM   #4
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Default MF vs. DMF

What's the advantage of DMF? Sounds like you'd need long curving 'piano fingers to hit all the buttons just right?
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Old Sep 20, 2002, 9:30 PM   #5
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Not really... only when you need 4x, that's when you need to use your thumb!

Normally after the camera has locked AF with the shutter release you can already turn the focus ring with your left hand (if you're right handed) to override the camera. Your right thumb normally rests on the 4-way paddle, the 4x button is right below it, and only if you want to zoom in the detail. To me it's much quicker this way, and I rarely go to MF anymore since the upgrade.

Like with the quickview button, you do not have to go to the playback mode anymore (although the camera let you) since it's much more convenient and faster as well to access playback from the record mode!
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Old Sep 20, 2002, 9:53 PM   #6
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Default Manual focusing

From my old SLR (Yashica TL-Electro X) I remember zooming in on the subject to fine focus & zooming back out to frame the shot.
That still true ? (in manual focus)
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Old Sep 21, 2002, 12:58 AM   #7
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Cald,
seems that this is rarely true , b/c of the varifocus type zoom lens ( D7 case) ( or some alike "advanced" optical notion )

Personally , I never do that , even on my film SLR28-200 zoom .
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Old Sep 21, 2002, 6:02 AM   #8
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To add to Kcan comment, this also hold true for AF as well: If you zoom after the camera has locked AF, you're guaranteed to get a blurred shot! (unless the DOF can save you)

This is the nature of the beast and hold true for any high power zoom (x5 - x8). Varifocal is a design compromise in digicam to keep the lens small and inexpensive... To verify this on any digicam, put the camera in continuous AF focus: you'll hear the AF gears working in the background as you zoom in and out!

... Well if anyone sports a motorized zoom, then one should hear two(2) mechanized geartrains going :P:P:P

[Edited on 9-21-2002 by NHL]
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Old Sep 21, 2002, 7:51 AM   #9
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Thanks all, I'm glad I asked. (Wasn't thinking)
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Old Sep 24, 2002, 12:07 PM   #10
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Default You can focus at telephoto, then zoom out.

You can zoom in to 200mm to focus and zoom out and take a picture - the camera adjusts the focusing as you zoom to try to keep the same focus distance, and since the DOF gets much wider at wide than at telephoto, you will not lose focus.

You cannot go the other way, as the focus is less accurate at wide angle due to the wide DOF.

To verify that the camera adjusts the focus, set the camera to MF and zoom. You will hear the focus motor running as it adjusts to try to maintain focus distance.
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