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Old Sep 25, 2002, 8:19 PM   #1
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Default Super Fine vs RAW 7i images

After going through all the hoops, I finally started taking shots with our 7i using the Minolta Viewer software. We were told the RAW files were the way to go with the 7ii, and we were told we needed the Minolta software so the pics didn't look flat. Well at first look, it's the RAW files that look flat, real flat, the Super Fine images look much better, more vibrant. (I still don't see what all the hoopla is about, I still think our old DC290 took better pics.) Anyway were stuck with the 7i since, like a fool, I sold the 290. The software, working with the RAW images, shows the image very small, is there a way to see the image bigger? It seems like it'll be hard to color correct an image thats only 3x3, the SF images can be blown up so you can at least see what you're doing. It also seems like the RAW images will need an imense amount of work to get them looking half way decent, is there any reason other than file size to go Raw instead of Super Fine? The 1GB Microdrive holds around 65 SF images, around 105 RAW. Any feedback would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Todd
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Old Sep 26, 2002, 6:00 AM   #2
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Like you've observed the raw picture is more compact (9.5MB) than the tiff output (ie super fine) and will have more latitude in post-capture adjustments. You can also get your super fine output back by saving the raw files in .tiff extension after you have opened them in raw.

The difference is with raw files, the PC compute the output pictures being display on the monitor vs the superfine outputs which are computed by the camera! The raw output are just that: raw 1 & 0 from the camera CCD with the appropriate camera settings including white balance, exposure setting, or any filter settings... Did you check the appropriate box in DIVU when you opened the raw files... Any setting other than sRGB will look really flat! It's not that they are bad, they are just mapped to a wider colorspace that the limited PC monitor can display, but other programs (or printers) can make good use of. The wider AdobeRGB colorspace for one can be optimized by PhotoShop! (but will look very flat)


http://www.dpreview.com/forums/read....essage=3456766


BTW why are you shooting in raw and super-fine when Fine is adequate for most applications (you can't tell a fine from superfine image anyway!)? The files size will be much smaller and you can take over 600 shots with the microdrive! The camera will be much quicker and the output will be more similar to most other cameras...(ie sRGB color space)

[Edited on 9-26-2002 by NHL]
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Old Sep 30, 2002, 1:03 PM   #3
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Default Advantage of using RAW...

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/read....essage=3479124
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Old Oct 21, 2002, 10:10 AM   #4
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Default RAW files

I don't like and therefore don't use the Minolta software provided with my D7i. I have found a freeware program by Patrick Porland that works very well. It allows you to adjust the Raw file then save as a 24 or 48 bit TIFF. It is also very fast and can be used as a viewer. Try it I think you will like it. The web address is http://perso.club-internet.fr/porlan/

Dave

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Old Oct 22, 2002, 9:44 AM   #5
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Even better (if you use Photoshop) is the Minolta Raw (MRW) Photoshop plugin. You can download it directly from this link.

http://www.arnason.no/modules.php?na...p=getit&lid=13

Put the mrw.8bi file in your "photoshop/plugins/file format" folder. You will now be able to open *.mrw files in Photoshop! There are a couple of pre-processing options, but you don't have to use them.

Thanks to jean6 for originally posting this link. I'm reposting the info to this thread so that more people will see it.

-jb
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Old Oct 24, 2002, 4:15 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -jb
Even better (if you use Photoshop) is the Minolta Raw (MRW) Photoshop plugin. You can download it directly from this link.

http://www.arnason.no/modules.php?na...p=getit&lid=13

Put the mrw.8bi file in your "photoshop/plugins/file format" folder. You will now be able to open *.mrw files in Photoshop! There are a couple of pre-processing options, but you don't have to use them.

Thanks to jean6 for originally posting this link. I'm reposting the info to this thread so that more people will see it.

-jb

:?: -jb, I had already downloaded the file and put it into Photoshop 7, but I haven't been able to figure out something. It allows me to view a raw file, manipulate it, and save it in various formats. It is probably a silly thing to do, but I would like be able to save it back into raw format. I can do this, but I can't get Photoshop 7 to read the saved file again. I get a crazy gray pattern when I open the file. Any ideas of what I should be doing, other than saving in tiff, etc.

Don
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Old Oct 24, 2002, 4:32 AM   #7
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Photoshop allows you to save in numerous format, and the original .mrw should not be disturbed in anyway (that your original negative copy). You can not save back in .mrw since this is not a valid file format, and is not a raw file from the camera anymore!

Tiff is the most universal, but keep the file as native Photoshop file is your best best since it preserve the layers information. But why? All theses format are very large beside your .mrw. In my opinion create your editings steps as an action and save it (let's call it MRW2Tiff for example). Everytime you need a copy or for converting other .mrw files (they should be very close unless the exposure is bad) just run this action again (the action file is very small)!

Remember you can duplicate this digital copy again anytime...
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Old Oct 24, 2002, 4:40 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don
I had already downloaded the file and put it into Photoshop 7, but I haven't been able to figure out something. It allows me to view a raw file, manipulate it, and save it in various formats. It is probably a silly thing to do, but I would like be able to save it back into raw format. I can do this, but I can't get Photoshop 7 to read the saved file again. I get a crazy gray pattern when I open the file. Any ideas of what I should be doing, other than saving in tiff, etc.
I haven't ever tried to save a MRW file back as a MRW file. I believe a MRW file is actually 12-bits per channel, that gets imported into Photoshop as 16 bits per channel. You couldn't downsize to 12 bit MRW again, but you could save your full image as a 48 bit TIFF without losing any information.

In reality, I view the MRW file as a negative, just as NHL said. I save any manipulated images as Photoshop PSD files. The action concept is neat, but I usually do a bit of hand manipulation on each image that couldn't be duplicated by an action.

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Old Oct 24, 2002, 5:20 PM   #9
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-jb

You can always insert breakpoint in an .atn file for your fine tuning steps (in fact I stop it at several points) and hit OK to continue... I'm the lazy kind, and addicted to automation :P
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Old Oct 24, 2002, 6:37 PM   #10
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The RAW file is equivalent to a film negative. You wouldn't take a felt pen to a negative, so why try to alter your raw file. Assuming you could do that, you cannot go back if you screw something up. Shot lost.
Bottom line: don't even think about it.

Declan :-)
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