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Old Oct 18, 2002, 1:44 PM   #1
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Default Anyone use the TIFF (superfine) mode insted of Jpeg (Fine)?

I was doing some testing of pictures by looking at them at 1600% zoom. It seems the TIFFs are blured but not blocky like the JPEG mode. I know why, Tiff isnt compressed and doesnt loose resolution. But the much longer write time and 1/5th the pictures 13 insted of 76 on my 128 CF are huge differences. Anyone have any uses for the TIFF mode to make it worth using? Thus far for family use and what ever, I havent found a need for better than Fine. Will the TIFF give a better print on a quality printer? Also, for repeaded savings and editing Tiff should do better correct?
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Old Oct 18, 2002, 3:53 PM   #2
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as far as the blur you say it has i haven't seen that in my shots. in making a crisper print that would depend on the printer also. but a tiff matched with a an excellent printer will produce a superior image if done correctly. there are other variables that would ply into it also.
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Old Oct 18, 2002, 4:13 PM   #3
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You can also use raw, it's smaller than .tiff @ only 9.5MB/picture and also not compressed. The only caveat is one needs to go through DIVU first (or Photoshop plug-ins), but can be saved back as .tiff or .jpeg @ the PC (beside offering better latitude in adjustment)

But like you said, for most purpose highest .jpeg is just fine!
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Old Oct 19, 2002, 12:16 AM   #4
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As NHL said, if you need the absolute best resolution, use RAW storage, otherwise stick with fine storage. If you do a lot of cropping of the image, or just want the best print possible you need to make some changes. In Photoshop be sure to increase the image size to match the size of the print, in inches or mm, you want AND be sure that the number of pixels/inch matches the resolution you are using on your printer before you make the print. 300 dpi is ok, but 600 dpi is better. This operation can take some time but it is worth it.

Y ou might also check out Qimage Pro printing software at:

www.ddisoftware.com

Amazingthailand swears by it.

One final note. My experience in the past is that with a large area of an evenly colored and evenly lit subject, like skin or a background, you will see "drop outs" with jpg but not with tiff, or presumably raw. You probably won't even see it in 99% of your shots if you use low compression for your jpgs, such as the 7 series cameras use, but at higher compression ratios the drop outs quickly become apparent. In any case, 8x10 prints shouldn't be a problem, even with some cropping. Just be sure to use a good photo quality printer, with paper and ink from the printer manufacturer for the best results.
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Old Oct 19, 2002, 7:05 AM   #5
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Also another option is to shoot in highest jpeg, and immediately store theses pictures as .tiff with DIVU batch! (hardisks are now cheap). There's a benefit this way since everyone regain the speed of their cameras... (I doubt anyone can see a difference in theses 1st generation jpeg's 1600% ???)

The D7hi 1/2.5 jpeg format is actually ideal for this!
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Old Oct 19, 2002, 1:17 PM   #6
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I can see a very slight difference. The Tiff is blurred at 1600x and the jpegs are blocky at 1600. The Tiff at 1600 is more recognizable than the blocky Jpeg. Anything less than 1600 they are not distinguishable by my eye. So I guess Jpeg is fine unless Iím at 1600 which is only when Iím playing with pictures. I guess I will shoot the fine mode, jpeg, and save as tiff to prevent any degradation when doing multiple saves. Thanks for the insight.
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Old Oct 19, 2002, 1:50 PM   #7
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1600% you say. i would put that well beyond the limit of my eyes on a 13x19. even a scanned kodachrome would start to show limits at that level.
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Old Oct 19, 2002, 5:22 PM   #8
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As far as print resoultion with any of the ink jets, 300 dpi is sufficient. little is to be gained by going higher. Don't be fooled by the big numbers the printer manufacturers give for resolution. They really refer to the spacing that the droplets are laid down on the paper, but remember they blend. 300 dpi can make very sharp prints providing you have a sharp image. Goiing above 300 is just a waste of file size. By the way, one popular way of estimating the required print resolution is to divide the printer's dpi by the number of colors the printer uses. Example- 1440 dpi/6 colors = 240 dpi or 2880/7 = 411. Also most agree that little quality is gained by using 2880 over 1400.
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