Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Konica Minolta

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 10, 2004, 4:13 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19
Default

Hi Everyone

I'e Just brought a Z3 and I'm so happy with it, But i'm a complete novice and i'm

not sure what settings are best for what situations.



can anyone tell me the best settings to capture RC cars racing round an indoor track please ?



Iv'e tried on the auto and sport setting but the cars seem a bit blured



thanks from a photo newbie :-)
RC18T is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 10, 2004, 8:04 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Goofas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 734
Default

Glad you like the Z3 too. I was a bit nervous about buying it at first due to Steves not so generous review. Every other review site gave it much higher remarks, so I went for it. I am not sure what setting will be the best for the RC cars. I find the anti shake feature does not do much. I have tried several moderate low ligt zoom shots and they still come out blurry. I just might not understand the whole anti shake thing. I have it turned off now on my camera. Might save some battery power in the off position. Post some shots when you get a chance.
Goofas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 10, 2004, 9:08 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 7
Default

Just got my Z3 the other day, been raining outside ever since I bought it so I don't have any outdoor pictures yet. Actually I'm just going through the manual and finding all the setup stuff and all the buttons to push. I have a quick release setup on my tripod which brings me to a point in addressing RC18T's question about what setting for indoor racing cars. I would think you might come out better using a tripod for these indoor pictures. Adjust your flash speed also. Seems to me being indoorsyour zoom setting and focus would be so close to your image that a tripod would work better. If you don't have a tripod do a test on someones shoulder or set the camera up and do a timed setting. It has a great anti shake lens but shooting fast moving objects at close range might need the stability of a tripod. Just a thought...
robwmc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 11, 2004, 9:41 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19
Default

here is a few pics I have taken with my Z3 , all these shots were taken in Auto mode

http://www.big-risk.com/pics/butch/

the below shots were taken within 5 mins of eachother

this is Night Portrait mode




this is full Auto mode




this is Night Portrait mode with the flash


this is full Auto mode with the flash

RC18T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 12, 2004, 3:56 PM   #5
Member
 
Clive Egginton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 43
Default

Are you in control of the RC cars? If so why not stop them first? Unless of course you want to show motion blur or they're flying through the air at the time ;-) Perhaps I'm being thick here.

If not, then you might be asking too much of this camera. All ultra-zooms have a small CCD, this means too much noise at the high ISO speeds (light sensitivity) eg 400 needed for low light level environments. The Panasonics have a faster lens (wider aperture) at long focal lengths compared with the Z3. You don't buy a hammer if you want to screw in screws (unless you're from Birmingham, UK).

Are your pictures going to show detail or atmosphere? Your night shots show how you can change the feeling in a photo.

The best way to learn is to do what you have been doing - experiment - get to know the camera's many limitations.

The anti-shake does wonders at the telephoto end in daylight, less effectively at close distance and not at all on a tripod. I would recommend using the evf not the lcd and finding something solid (a wall or furniture) to press your head against.

I've got some pix at http://kcegginton.fotopic.net but nothing like what you're trying to do.

/Clive
Clive Egginton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 12, 2004, 7:03 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19
Default



Hi Clive

I want to photograph them in action, they are not going fast , maybe 15 - 20 mph

here is a couple of examples






the above photos were taken in sports mode with no flash and on a tripod,

I am going to try S mode next and speed up the shutter and higher the ISO and

maybe use a flash and see how that helps.



Clive you take some outstanding Photos

I think the grave yard and the moon are my favs




Oh and i'm in Hertfordshire not Birmingham :lol:

RC18T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 12, 2004, 10:16 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 440
Default

RC18T wrote:
Quote:
Iv'e tried on the auto and sport setting but the cars seem a bit blured
Auto setting just measures the existing light and lets the camera calculate an exposure that is good for an average picture-taking situation. The need to freeze high-speed objects is not in the realm of a normal picture-taking situation (as you've found out). Sport setting moves the shutter speeds up, but still might not be high enough, especially if there isn't enough light to make a high-speed exposure.

You will have to do one of two things in order to get sharp pics of quickly moving objects. One is to go to shutter priority mode and increase shutter speed high enough to stop the action. The problem here is that in all likelyhood there will not be enough ambient light to make a good exposure at such a high shutter speed. Hopefully that will not be your case. If you still can't get a good exposure at a higher shutter speed, then you can increase ISO and try again.

The second thing would be to use a flash, either the camera's if the cars are close enough, or a very strong accessory flash, which still might not be strong enough if your cars are very far away. One good thing about using the flash is that the quick burst of light becomes an effective shutter speed.

The use of a tripod will not help your particular situation. If your shutter speed is high enough to freeze the cars, it will also be high enough to hand hold the camera.

PhilR.



PhilR. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 14, 2004, 7:55 AM   #8
Member
 
Clive Egginton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 43
Default

Hi RC18T - thanks for your compliments about my pix - I think that my success rate at getting a good pic is about 1 in a hundred - but that's no problem with a digital camera (at least there's no cost to the wastage). That's why it's good to experiment - instant results tell you whether you're on the right track.

I was right then about the flying cars! I guess that if you want to shoot the cars in action then you want that reflected in your pix (otherwise you may as well shoot them when they're standing still).

I would be tempted to try the following: use P mode; set manual focus and wait for the cars to reach the right distance; use fill-flash and PAN with the car.

Hopefully this would give you a clear image of the car (from the flash) with some slight motion blur around it and the track and walls showing more blur.

You might want to experiment with the subject/background exposure balance by playing with the flash and EV compensation settings.

Hope this helps.

/Clive

PS the Birmingham reference was to a 'brummagem screwdriver' by the way.
Clive Egginton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 18, 2004, 5:00 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19
Default

Thanks very much for the advice Clive



at the moment work is so busy i only get sunday off and thats tied up doing family things

but we have a car meet on Monday the 20th so i'll do some experimenting then
RC18T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 19, 2004, 12:21 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 208
Default

If there is ample lighting, I would try going to manual shutter priority and set the shutter to 1/1000. That should get as quick action as you're going to have. I would guess that you'll get a slightly more stable shot if you take it from approach or behind the vehicle, so you reduce blur a bit just by your vantage point.

I also love my Z3, and the most fun is experimenting with different settings and finding out how they change the result in various environments.

My only complaint, but this seems to happen to most digital cameras and I suspect it has to do with color temperatures and lighting, is that in low-light there often seems to be a red haze over everything. Why red as opposed to any other color? again I suspect it is a physics thing that I'm not aware of. A quick "Auto Levels" and "Auto Color" in Photoshop cleans it right up.

Best luck and enjoy your Z3!
DanielT2 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:27 AM.